Maritime Telegraph & Telephone
Company Limited

1910 - 1999


Historical Notes about
MT&T

Also see: Bell Aliant Inc.
Nova Scotia Telephone Company


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In April 1910, Nova Scotia's largest telephone company, the Nova Scotia Telephone Company (NS Telco) was reorganized as the Maritime Telegraph & Telephone Company.  The assets – including all property, pole lines, rights-of-way, equipment, and accounts receivable – and liabilities, including all bonded debt and accounts payable – were transferred to MT&T.  The employees and management of NS Telco became employees and management of MT&T.  The daily business continued uninterrupted.

For nine decades, from April 1910 until May 1999, MT&T was by far the dominant telephone company in Nova Scotia.  MT&T was by no means the only telephone company here during that time.  There were many others – more than 200 telephone companies served Nova Scotians in the 1920s through the 1950s – but MT&T was by far the largest both in the number of "subscribers" (paying customers) and in the geographical territory served.

For example, on 31st December 1965, the total number of telephones in Nova Scotia was 224,077.  218,533 were MT&T telephones (the monthly bills for these telephones were issued by and were paid to MT&T), and 5,544 were connected to other companies.  MT&T had 97.5% of all telephones in the Province, while the remaining 2.5% were divided among the other 131 telephone companies then in business here.  (These figures are found on page xxx of of the 1965 Annual Report of the Public Utilities Board.)

From 1910 into the mid-1990s, MT&T had a legal monopoly on telephone service in the territory it served.  That is, if your residence or place of business was located in the territory legally reserved for MT&T then you had no choice; if you wanted to have a telephone you had to rent it (you could not buy your own telephone, and you had to rent, not buy, even if you wanted a telephone cord longer than the standard cord supplied by company) from MT&T at a rate approved by the Public Utilities Board.  If your residence or place of business was located in a territory legally reserved for another telephone company, again you had no choice; if you wanted to have a telephone you were not allowed to obtain your telephone equipment or your telephone connection from MT&T; instead you had to arrange to get it from the telephone company that held the legal monopoly for your area, at a rate approved by the Public Utilities Board.  From the beginning of the twentieth century into the mid-1990s, that was the way it was – in Nova Scotia and throughout North America.




1910 April 22

Maritime Telegraph & Telephone
Company Limited

On this day, the Nova Scotia Legislature passed an Act (chapter 156, 1910, 10 Edward VII) to incorporate the Maritime Telegraph & Telephone Company Limited, head office in Halifax, with capital of $500,000 divided among 50,000 shares of $10 each, with legal authority to "construct, buy, lease, or otherwise acquire telegraph and telephone lines and cables, conduits, and plant, and to maintain and operate same... To amalgamate with any telegraph or telephone company...".

The Act named the founding shareholders as: Samuel M. Brookfield, of the City of Halifax, Contractor; Walter H. Covert, of the City of Halifax, Barrister-at-law; and A. Ernest Ings, of the City of Charlottetown, Barrister-at-law.

Section 21 specified that MT&T "shall on or before the first day of May in each and every year, deliver to the Clerk of each County," or where a County is divided into two or more municipalities then to the Clerk of each Municipality, "a sworn statement of the number of miles of pole lines owned by the Company in such County or Municipality, together with a sum of money equal to one dollar" for each mile of pole line in the district, "and such sum of one dollar per mile shall be payment in full by the Company" of all county and municipal property taxes.

One dollar per mile is equivalent to 62¢ per kilometre.

Section 28 prohibited the tapping of telephone lines, and section 29 specified that the penalty for illegally tapping a telephone line was $100 plus $40 per day during the time the tap remained in place.

Section 32 enabled MT&T to set up and operate its own electric generating equipment "in any city or town" where no electric utility system was available.



Chapter 156 of the Acts of 1910, "An Act to Incorporate the Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited", was passed by the Nova Scotia Legislature in April 1910.  (There is a reference, from an apparently reliable source, to an earlier incorporation, in 1906, of a company with the same name – this will be tracked down ASAP.)




1910 June 28

On this day, MT&T bought a large number of shares of The Prince Edward Island Telephone Company, which had been operating a public telephone service since 10 April 1885.





1912 November 1

The following is excerpted from a long report in the Public Utility Board's 1913 Annual Report (which covered 1912 and 1913), printed under the heading "Re Petition of the Nova Scotia Carriage and Motor Car Company Limited For An All-Night Service in the Town of Kentville".  In September 1912, the hours of service furnished by MT&T Co. at the Kentville Exchange, with 240 subscribers, was 7:30am - 9:00pm daily, except Sundays and holidays 9:00am - 10:00am and 1:30pm - 2:30pm.  After extensive evidence was presented, the Public Utilities Board issued an Order that, on and after 10 October 1912, MT&T "will be required to provide" a continuous (24-hour) service at the Kentville Exchange, "excepting on Sundays and statutory holidays, on which days the Exchange may be closed from 7:00am to 9:00am, 10:00am to 1:30pm, and 2:30pm to 10:00pm".  This did not end the matter.  On 4 October 1912, the PUB issued a modification of the Order: Because of difficulty in securing a satisfactory operator to attend to night calls, and the necessity of having special equipment (audible signalling devices) made to order, the MT&T Co. asked for, and the Board granted, an extension of the time fixed for 24-hour service from 10 October 1912 to 1 November 1912.

1913 Annual Report of the Public Utilities Board, title page
1913 Annual Report of the Public Utilities Board:   Title page





1912 December 31

MT&T reported total gross (before expenses) operating revenue of $500,542.87, for the year 1912.



1913 January 16

On this day, MT&T received official approval to put into effect the "Pony Farmers' Line Rate"... for the following eighteen places, in the first named twelve of which it is in force at the present time, viz: Debert, Belmont, Alma, Hopewell, Maccan, Spryfield, Beach Meadows, Eastern Passage, St. Margaret's Bay, Clarkesville, Tracadie, Heatherton, Doddridge, Harbour au Bouche, Big Bras d'Or, Alder Point, East Bay, and Jacksonville... a monthly rate of $1.00 for house and $1.25 for business telephones."  In subsequent Orders dated 4 April 1913 and 6 May 1913, the Pony Farmer Line Rate was approved to be put into effect on 20 May 1913, for Argyle in Yarmouth County, Northfield in Lunenburg County, Wentworth in Cumberland County, and Heatherton in Antigonish County.



1913 July 9

On this day, the Public Utilities Board held a public hearing in Canning, Kings County, on the complaint of Arthur S. Burgess, manager of the Trading Company Limited, Canning, versus Maritime Telegraph & Telephone Company.  The Board's report was printed in its Annual Report for 1913.
Report of the PUB on this complaint, July 1913



1914 January 2

MT&T advertisement: "Put a Telephone in Your Home"
[The Halifax Morning Chronicle 2 January 1914]



1914 April

In April 1914, the Municipality of the County of Halifax requested an inventory of MT&T's lines in the Municipality (the County of Halifax, outside the limits of the City of Halifax and the Town of Dartmouth), for the purpose of taxation assessment.  This inventory showed the following, serving 300 telephones:
Inventory of MT&T's lines
in the
Municipality of the County of Halifax
April 1914

CONDUCTOR LENGTH IN
OPERATION
VALUE
PER MILE
Copper wire #12 495 miles $50
Copper wire #14 188 miles $37
Iron wire #12 657 miles $17
 
These copper wire sizes (#14 and #12) are defined
as part of the Brown & Sharpe wire gauge system.


Note (of special interest those interested in mathematics):
The Brown & Sharpe wire gauge, which has been the standard
method, in the U.S. and Canada, of measuring copper wire sizes
for more than a century, uses the highest mathematical exponent
or index of any industrial system.  The legal definition of the Brown
& Sharpe wire gauge defines the ratio between successive sizes
to be the 39th root of 92.  No other practical working industrial
system includes an exponent or index anywhere near 39.

Brown and Sharpe ratio of consecutive wire sizes: 39th root of 92




1922

In 1922, the Directors of MT&T (listed alphabetically) were:
    S.M. Brookfield, President, Halifax
    O.E. Smith, Vice-President, Halifax
    George E. Faulkner, Halifax
    E.L. MacDonald, Halifax
    L.B. McFarlane, Montreal
    Andrew MacKinlay, Halifax
    G. Fred Pearson, Halifax
    C.F. Sise, Montreal
    J.H. Winfield, Managing Director, Halifax
Source: MT&T Telephone Directories, 1922

Note: The two directors who lived in Montreal were the designated representatives of the Bell Telephone Company of Canada, which owned a substantial block of MT&T shares and was legally entitled to name two MT&T directors.




1934

In 1934, applications were received by the PUB for automatic dial exchange service at Monastery, Brookfield, Lawrencetown, Riverport, Clifton, Collingwood, Hantsport, Lockeport, Maccan, Mill Village, Port Greville, Port Maitland, Pubnico, Woods Harbour, and Bedford.  All these applications were approved, and by the end of the year the new equipment was installed in Monastery, Lawrencetown, Brookfield, and Riverport exchanges, giving continuous (24-hour) service to telephone users in these areas.



1934 April 16

On this day, the Board of Commissioners of Public Utilities wrote:

"In the areas presently served by MT&T, 98 of the exchanges have, each, fewer than ninety lines and three hundred subscribers connected.  Ten of these exchanges pay Group 2A rates and get continuous (24-hour) service every day.

Of the remaining 88 exchanges, 28 fall within groups 1A and 1B, the subscribers pay lower rates than are applicable for Group 2A, and continuous service is provided on weekdays with restricted hours of service on Sundays and holidays.

The remaining 60 exchanges fall within Group 1, the subscribers pay still lower rates than those payable in Groups 1A and 1B; other than emergency service, no service is furnished at night and only restricted hours on Sundays and holidays.  The emergency service is furnished at the rate of 25 cents per call and the revenue produced therefrom amounts to about $3500 per year.  Of this, ninety per cent goes to the operators who perform the extra service and ten per cent to MT&T.



1934 May 19

On this day, official approval was issued, by the Public Utilities Board to MT&T, to convert the Hantsport exchange to automatic (dial) service.  In early 1934, just before this conversion, the hours of service at the Hantsport exchange were: Continuous (24-hour) service every day except Sundays and holidays, when the hours were midnight to 8:00am, 9:00am to 10:00am, 1:30pm to 3:00pm, and 10:00pm to midnight.  At that time, the Hantsport exchange had 56 lines carrying 75 subscribers.



1936

"Automatic (dial) telephone service... is becoming increasingly popular, particularly in small exchanges which are thereby enabled to have continuous (24-hour) service.  The MT&T Company, the largest operating telephone company in the Province, have been pioneers in this type of equipment, having established the first automatic exchange in Eastern Canada.  Since that time the forward march of automatic service in this Province has been rapid..."

During 1936 the following exchanges were converted to dial operation: Bedford, Wellington, LaHave, Port Mouton, and Weymouth.  In order to secure automatic equipment for any particular exchange, it was required that a majority of the subscribers served by that exchange sign a petition to that effect (because the conversion of an exchange to automatic operation was accompanied by a significant increase in the monthly rate charged to the subscribers served by that exchange).

[Excerpted from the Annual Report of The Board of Commissioners of Public Utilities for the year 1936.]



1939 June 29

Maritime Telegraph & Telephone Company advertisement
MT&T front page advertisement in The Maritime Merchant, volume XLVII (v47 n26) 29 June 1939
Maritime Telegraph & Telephone Company advertisement
Front page, The Maritime Merchant, (v47 n26) 29 June 1939
Size of this ad as printed: 19.2cm × 22.1cm

The printer misspelled the MT&T company name!




1948 November 19

On this day, MT&T put into regular operation the first commercial microwave link in the world, between Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia.



1950

In 1950, the Directors of MT&T were:
    W.A. Winfield, President, Halifax
    C.A.B. Bullock, Halifax
    M.R. Chappell, Sydney
    Frederick Johnson, Montreal
    George Killam, Yarmouth
    R.V. Macaulay, Montreal
    A. Murray MacKay, General Manager, Halifax
    E.L. MacDonald, Vice-President, Halifax
    John W. MacLeod, New Glasgow
    C.J. Morrow, Lunenburg
    Francis D. Smith, K.C., Halifax
Source: MT&T Telephone Directories, 1950

Note: The two directors who lived in Montreal were the designated representatives of the Bell Telephone Company of Canada, which owned a substantial block of MT&T shares and was legally entitled to name two MT&T directors.





1954

MT&T Long Distance Rules
(before Direct Distance Dialing)

MTT Long Distance Rules 1954 (before Direct Distance Dialing)
MT&T Long Distance Rules (before Direct Distance Dialing)
Source: MT&T Western District Telephone Directory, January 1954




1962 February 08

Conversion to Seven-Digit Telephone Numbers

An 18-month campaign to convert the province's dial telephones to seven-digit numbers is nearly complete.  Cornwallis and seven other exchanges in western Nova Scotia are about to be assigned numbers to complete the campaign.  The Dominion Atlantic Railway station at Cornwallis, which until now has been reached at telephone number 759, would become 638-8759 (last three digits same as before) under the new plan.
[50 Years Ago in the Digby County Courier, 9 February 2012]


The conversion of all of Nova Scotia's dial telephone exchanges to a uniform seven-digit numbering system was an essential step in the preparations to implement Direct Distance Dialing (DDD).  Before the introduction of DDD, all long-distance calls had to be set up by a switchboard operator, an employee of the telephone company whose job was to ask the caller the geographical location (anywhere in the world) of the person or company he/she wanted to speak to, and the local telephone number there, and then to make the necessary arrangements for the calling party and the called party to talk to each other.





Ten-digit telephone numbers throughout Nova Scotia
will become effective officially on 16 November 2014




1966 June 10

MT&T Corporate Objectives

Take over the remaining 144 rural telephone companies

At a meeting of the Public Utilities Board in Halifax on 10 June 1966, Mr. Donald W. Myers, Vice-President and General Manager of MT&T, "made reference to the six specific objectives which MT&T proposes to achieve over a ten year period and which have been outlined by officers of MT&T in previous recent hearings.  These include accelerated dial conversion, the take over of as many of the remaining 144 rural telephone companies as possible, the reduction in party-line fills to a maximum of ten with an average goal of six or seven, the enlargement of base rate areas, the establishment of more extended area service, and the provision of more direct distance dialing." MT&T is proceeding with the necessary work "to provide dial service in the Hubbards, St. Margaret's, and French Village Exchange Areas by July 10th, 1966, and to provide direct distance dialing in the general Halifax area by March 1967.  This general Halifax area includes the Halifax-Dartmouth Metropolitan Area and the adjacent Exchange Areas of Bedford, Bay Road, and Sackville..." The Hubbards, St. Margaret's, and French Village Exchange Areas, currently being converted to dial operation, will be included in the direct distance dialing service.  As part of this general upgrading of the telephone system in this area, Extended Area Service will be implemented "between Hubbards and St. Margaret's Exchange Areas, and between St. Margaret's and French Village Exchange Areas."

In its report dated 8 July 1966, the PUB wrote: "The St. Margaret's Exchange Area is located at the head of St. Margaret's Bay and includes the communities of Ingramport, Boutilier's Point, Head of St. Margaret's Bay, French Village Station, and Tantallon.  The Hubbards Exchange Area is immediately adjacent to the west of St. Margaret's Exchange Area and includes the communities of Mill Cove, Fox Point, Hubbards, Queensland, and Black Point.  The French Village Exchange Area is immediately adjacent to the south of St. Margaret's Exchange Area and includes the communities of Glen Haven, French Village, Seabright, Glen Margaret, Hackett's Cove, Indian Harbour, Peggy's Cove, and West Dover.  At the present time, service is provided on a manual magneto basis in each Exchange Area.  Each Exchange Area has its own central office and will have its own dial office when dial service is inaugurated."

"Hubbards Exchange serves 382 subscribers, St. Margaret's serves 550 subscribers, and French Village serves 372 subscribers.  Hubbards Exchange originates approximately 6,000 long distance calls per year to St. Margaret's Exchange and St. Margaret's originates approximately 7,300 calls to Hubbards for a total of 13,300 calls.  St. Margaret's Exchange originates approximately 4,700 long distance calls per year to French Village Exchange and French Village originates approximately the same number to St. Margaret's for a total of 9,400 calls.  Total long distance calls between Hubbards and French Village Exchanges is approximately 2,400 per year."

The implementation of Extended Area Service between two exchanges has the effect of increasing the base monthly charge paid by each subscriber in both areas, because the base rate is figured by counting the combined number of subscribers in both exchanges, while at the same time long distance charges between the two exchanges are eliminated.

The PUB report continues: "Financial statistics and estimates support the supply of Extended Area Services under the plans proposed herein by MT&T and a canvass (of subscribers in the affected areas) was conducted by MT&T on the basis that the Extended Area Service plans would result in an increase in Hubbards and French Village Exchange service rates from Group 1 to Group 2, and an increase in St. Margaret's Exchange service rates from Group 2 to Group 3.  Results of the canvass were: Of the 477 subscribers in the Hubbards Exchange Area, including the districts of Black Point and Ingramport (which had been included in the St. Margaret's Exchange but will be included in the Hubbards Exchange when the dial conversion is implemented), 394 or 88.1% voted, and 377 or 84.3% of the total number of subscribers voted in favour of Extended Area Service with St. Margaret's; of the 368 subscribers in the French Village Exchange Area 304 or 82.6% voted, and 220 or 59.8% of the total number of subscribers voted in favour of Extended Area Service with St. Margaret's; of the 475 subscribers in the St. Margaret's Exchange Area, not including the districts of Black Point and Ingramport, 420 or 89.3% voted, and 376 or 79.2% of the total number of subscribers voted in favour of Extended Area Service with Hubbards and French Village Exchanges.  Evidence was given by Mr. M.B. McMahon, Development Assistant at MT&T, with respect to the manner in which the canvass was conducted and the information is recorded (in the PUB records)."

The PUB approved the Extended Area Service plans between Hubbards and St. Margaret's Exchange Areas, and between St. Margaret's and French Village Exchange Areas, effective July 10th, 1966.

[Excerpted from the Annual Report of The Board of Commissioners of Public Utilities for the year 1966.]



It is unclear what Mr. Myers, Vice-President and General Manager of MT&T, may have had in mind when he testified before the Public Utilities Board (see above) in June 1966 that one of the corporate objectives of MT&T was to “take over...as many of the remaining 144 rural telephone companies as possible...”  My information (see list below) is that there were 132 telephone companies active in Nova Scotia as of 31 December 1965.  This list of 132 includes MT&T, thus there were only 131 rural telephone companies “remaining” to be taken over by MT&T – not 144 as stated by Vice-President Myers.  This list (below) appears as part of Schedule C on pages 497-500 of the 1965 Annual Report of the Public Utilities Board; it is the official list of telephone companies legally authorized to be in business in Nova Scotia as of 31 December 1965.  There were no telephone companies added or eliminated between 31 December 1965 and 10 June 1966.  That is, the PUB's list of 131 telephone companies (other than MT&T) is in direct contradiction to Mr. Myer's statement that there were 144 rural telephone companies “remaining” to be taken over.  This was sworn testimony in a significant proceeding before an important government agency, and a Vice-President would be careful not to give inaccurate information in such a proceeding.  It remains unclear what Mr. Myers may have had in mind.
List of all telephone companies in
Nova Scotia as of 31 December 1965
  1. Admiral Rock Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  2. Baddeck Bridge Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  3. Bailey's Brook Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  4. Barney's River Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  5. Barra Glen Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  6. Bayfield & Summerside Mutual Telephone Co. Ltd.
  7. Beacon Hill Milburn Mutual Telephone Co. Ltd.
  8. Belleville Rural Telephone Company
  9. Belmont Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  10. Big Bras d'Or Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  11. Big Island Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  12. Big Pond Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  13. Brookfield Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  14. Brookvale Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  15. Brook Village Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  16. Brule Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  17. Caledonia Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  18. Camden Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  19. Canaan Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  20. Caribou Mines Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  21. Central New Annan Telephone Company
  22. Central West River Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  23. Cobequid Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  24. Cumberland Rural Telephone Company
  25. Denmark & Middleton Mutual Telephone Co. Ltd.
  26. Dunmore Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  27. Earltown Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  28. East Inglisville Rural Telephone Company
  29. East Petpeswick Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  30. East Sable River Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  31. East Tracadie Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  32. East Victory Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  33. East Wallace Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  34. East Wentworth Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  35. Eden Lake Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  36. Englishtown Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  37. Evangeline Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  38. Falls Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  39. Falmouth Valley Rural Telephone Company
  40. Forks Baddeck Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  41. Fox Brook Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  42. Fox Harbour Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  43. French Cove Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  44. Glengarry Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  45. Glenmore Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  46. Grand River Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  47. Grand View Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  48. Greenfield Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  49. Grosvenor Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  50. Harmony Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  51. Harrison Road Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  52. Heathbell, Elmfield & Plainfield M.T. Company Ltd.
  53. Heatherton Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  54. Hedgeville Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  55. Higginsville Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  56. Hilden Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  57. Homeville Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  58. Indian Point Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  59. Jeddore Rural Telephone Company
  60. Kemptown Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  61. Lakeview Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  62. L'Ardoise Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  63. Lorne Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  64. Lovat Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  65. Mabou Harbour Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  66. Malagash Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  67. Malagawatch Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  68. Mansfield Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  69. Maritime Telegraph & Telephone Company Limited
  70. Mattie Settlement Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  71. Meadowvale Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  72. Melville Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  73. Middle River Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  74. Milford Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  75. Millsville & Rogers Hill Mutual Telephone Co. Ltd.
  76. Mooseland Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  77. Moose River Gold Mines Mutual Telephone Co. Ltd.
  78. Murchyville Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  79. Musquodoboit Harbour Rural Telephone Company
  80. Nevada Valley Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  81. New Campbellton Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  82. New Chester Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  83. New St. Anns Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  84. New Truro Road Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  85. New Victoria Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  86. North Wallace Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  87. Nyanza Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  88. Oban Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  89. Ostrea Lake Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  90. Petpeswick Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  91. Pictou Island Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  92. Piedmont Valley Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  93. Pinevale Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  94. Pleasant Bay Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  95. Pleasant Harbour Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  96. Pomquet Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  97. Port Lorne Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  98. Pugwash River Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  99. Red Islands Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  100. River Bourgeois Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  101. River Dennis Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  102. Riversdale Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  103. Riverside Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  104. River View Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  105. Roslin Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  106. Ross Ferry Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  107. Round Island Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  108. Sable River Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  109. St. Mary's Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  110. Salmon River Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  111. Salt Springs Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  112. Seafoam Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  113. Ship Harbour Lake Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  114. Smithville Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  115. South Branch Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  116. South Lochaber Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  117. South River Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  118. South West Margaree Mutual Telephone Co. Ltd.
  119. Springside Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  120. Spry Bay Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  121. Upper Clyde Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  122. Wallace Bay Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  123. Wallace Bridge Rural Telephone Company
  124. Wallace Point Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  125. Wallace Union Rural Telephone Company
  126. Wallace & Wentworth Mutual Telephone Co. Ltd.
  127. West Hants Rural Telephone Company Limited
  128. West Mabou Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  129. West Middle River Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  130. West New Annan Mutual Telephone Company Ltd.
  131. West River Mutual Telephone Company Limited
  132. West Tatamagouche Mutual Telephone Co. Ltd.
NOTE: In the above list, many of the companies have “Mutual” included in their corporate names.  These companies were incorporated under special legislation known as the Rural Telephone Act. This provincial legislation was initially enacted about 1916, with the objective of making it possible for telephone service to be extended to rural areas in which the population was scattered, with only a very few potential customers for each mile of pole line – not enough for a private company such as MT&T to be able to install and maintain the lines and equipment with any hope of getting enough revenue to support the necessary investment.  No major company would build a line into the rural sections since it wouldn't pay them to do so.  The only way to get a telephone was to build your own line and have your own company.

These were “mutual” companies, meaning that they were owned by their customers.  When several residents and small businesses in a particular area decided they wanted telephone service, each person or business that wanted telephone service would buy a share of the mutual company's stock.  The money raised in this way was used to pay for the construction of the necessary pole lines and installation of a switchboard and other equipment.  The switchboard often was installed in the home of one of the shareholders, and was attended by whoever happened to be handy when someone wanted to make a phone call.  Each mutual company was connected to the North American telephone network at the nearest MT&T exchange.



 

1966 September 10

MT&T Act of Incorporation Amended

Premier Robert Stanfield Exacts Harsh Revenge

Special Session of the Legislature

On 18 August 1966, Bell Canada, the largest telephone company in the country, made a surprise offer to buy control of the telephone companies that served the three Maritime Provinces.  On 24 July 1962, Bell Canada had acquired 99% of the shares of Avalon Telephone Company [later named the Newfoundland Telephone Company and in 1998 known as NewTel].  In 1966, Bell decided it wanted control of both Maritime Telegraph & Telephone (MT&T) of Halifax, which served most of Nova Scotia, and the New Brunswick Telephone Company [now NBTel, a subsidiary of Bruncor] of Saint John, which served New Brunswick.  MT&T owned 56% of the Island Telephone Company of Charlottetown, which served Prince Edward Island.  If Bell's offer to buy shares was approved, it would increase its stake in each of the two companies to 51%, from the 35% it already held in NBTel and the 6% it held in MT&T.  That 51% share ownership would give Bell complete control of the telephone services in all three provinces (except for the insignificant territories then served by the 124 independent telephone companies then operating in Nova Scotia, all of which were tiny companies typically serving from 10 to 50 customers each).  It was estimated the deal would cost about $60,000,000 and would require about 1,190,000 common shares of Bell; the proposal was to swap three Bell shares for five MT&T shares, and five for eleven of NBTel's shares.

This sudden decision, to buy control of the Maritimes telephone companies, was the result of Bell's humiliating failure, in its attempt to buy Quebec Telephone of Rimouski, which served 109,000 customers along both sides of the St. Lawrence River downriver from Quebec City, including the Gaspe Peninsula on the south shore, and the north shore up to the Labrador boundary.  While it was deep in negotiations with Quebec Telephone, Bell was taken completely by surprise when, on 17 March 1966, Quebec Telephone signed a deal to sell control to Anglo-Canadian Telephone Company of Montreal, which was owned by General Telephone & Electronics Corporation (GTE) of Stamford, Connecticut, the second-largest telephone company in the United States.  Through Anglo-Canadian, GTE then owned 50.3% of British Columbia Telephone Company, Canada's second-largest telephone company.  [In 1998, GTE still controls BCTel].  Bell had been trying to buy control of Quebec Telephone, "to take them out of play for GTE," according to Robert Scrivener, then vice-president of finance at Bell, and later president and chairman of both Bell Canada and Northern Electric.

In a public statement made at the time of the offer to buy control of MT&T and NBTel, Marcel Vincent, Bell's president, said: "The directors of Bell Canada feel strongly that, in the best interests of the progressive development of this essential Canadian industry, we must do all we can to insure that as many as possible of the key elements of the telephone industry remain permanently under Canadian ownership and control."  The offer to buy control of MT&T and NBTel was made on 18 August 1966, and was set to expire on 8 September.  Bell did not expect any significant resistance.

But Robert Stanfield, then premier of Nova Scotia, was livid at Bell's attempt to acquire control of MT&T.  Contrary to Stanfield's popular image as a meek politician known for his underwear business, he proved to be far more dangerous to Bell than anyone thought possible.  With the Nova Scotia Legislature as his weapon, the premier was determined to use the force of law to stop Bell in its tracks.

Stanfield also had a second weapon which turned out to be even more potent in what became a bitter and intense campaign against Bell's scheme.  In 1962 Bell had bought 100% of the shares of Northern Electric, the large Canadian telephone equipment manufacturer.  Immediately following the announcement of Bell's bid for MT&T, the federal anti-combines watchdog D.W.H. Henry, Director of Investigation Research (DIR) under the Combines Investigation Act, received complaints about Bell's purchasing practices and relationship with Northern Electric.  Henry used that complaint as the pretext for launching an extensive investigation.  He obtained search warrants, and a team of investigators from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police raided Bell's executive offices on 29 November 1966.  The investigators remained on the premises collecting and copying documents until 9 December.  This raid marked the beginning of a legal battle that lasted sixteen years.  The DIR's target was Bell's relationship with Northern Electric and the goal of the investigation was to force the breakup of the two companies.  Henry's investigation was initiated on the grounds that he had "reason to believe" that Section 33 of the Combines Act was either being or was about to be violated.  But the investigation was precipitated by the flurry of acquisitions of independent telephone companies, launched by Bell early in 1966 to expand its system.  Bell's intent was to become dominant in the telephone business in Canada, and, except for Quebec Telephone, it had been successful in buying several independents.

Stanfield linked the two events — the DIR's investigation of Bell and Bell's offer to buy control of MT&T — in his statement released on 22 August 1966:

It is important that the Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited be free to acquire telephone equipment that is best suited to our needs and will give the best service.  MT&T should be free to buy telephone equipment from any supplier.  Clearly, therefore, MT&T should not be controlled by a company which manufactures telephone equipment, either directly or through a subsidiary... If the Bell company were to acquire control of MT&T, MT&T would not long be free to exercise any independence of decision in acquiring telephone equipment.


"They looked at it as... an invasion of Atlantic Canada," Jean de Grandpre said of the Nova Scotia government twenty-four years later.  "You have no idea how vicious it was... You would think there was a war between Ottawa and Halifax," he said, referring to the front-page headlines of the Halifax Chronicle-Herald.  De Grandpre was Bell's corporate counsel at the time, and did much of the legal work for all the acquisitions that summer.  The souring of the MT&T deal led Scrivener and Vincent to turn to de Grandpre as a trouble-shooter in their abortive eleventh-hour attempt to get the deal pushed through.  Out of anger, and believing they had no need to negotiate with the provincial government, Bell's officials spurned Stanfield's request for a meeting to work out a compromise, leading the premier to recall the Nova Scotia Legislature into session on Friday, 9 September 1966.  He made good on his threat to introduce special legislation severely curtailing the voting rights of MT&T shareholders, which could be done legally because MT&T had been incorporated under an Act (chapter 156, 1910, 10 Edward VII) passed by the Legislature on 22 April 1910.  MT&T was incorporated under provincial legislation, and the Legislature could revise that legislation as it saw fit.  The amendment, to the Act to incorporate the Maritime Telegraph & Telephone Company Limited, was passed on Saturday, 10 September, and received royal assent the same day.  The legislation allowed Bell to buy any number of MT&T shares, but it prevented Bell from voting more than one thousand shares.  Outside the Legislature, Stanfield declared: "During my ten years as premier, I have never encountered men who pursue their own interests so ruthlessly while expressing patriotic sentiments."

After the dust settled, Bell had acquired 52.4% of MT&T's shares.  De Grandpre threatened to challenge Stanfield's legislation in court, but this was never done.  But the legal problems Bell encountered for years afterward, from the Combines Investigation and related developments, were enough to prompt Bell historian Lawrence Surtees to write: "Stanfield could not have exacted a harsher revenge on Bell.  The complaints to the DIR over the MT&T acquisition not only provided ammunition for the combines inquiry, but also jeopardized Bell's objectives in Parliament."

[Excerpted from pages 109-111, Pa Bell: The Meteoric Rise of Bell Canada Enterprises by Lawrence Surtees, Random House, 1992, ISBN 0394221427.]




1968 February

In February 1968, the telephone exchange at Tusket, in Yarmouth County, was converted to dial operation.
— "40 Years Ago" in The Yarmouth Vanguard, 5 February 2008




1990 December 20

Directory Assistance Charge
Increased from 50¢ to 75¢

Telecom Decision CRTC 90-30
Section XIII-E: Directory Assistance Charges

Ottawa, 20 December 1990
Telecom Decision CRTC 90-30

MT&T proposes to increase its local...directory assistance charge from $0.50 to $0.75. MT&T stated that the proposed increases will help to compensate for the cost of providing the service and will better reflect the value of the service to the customer.  The company views billable directory assistance calls as a premium service that should provide maximum contribution to revenues.

The Atlantic Communications and Technical Workers Union (ACTWU) stated that directory assistance is a widely-used service and that, in the absence of costing support, the company has not demonstrated that the proposed increase is just and reasonable.  In this regard, ACTWU argued that the proposed introduction of Automated Voice Response System should result in reduced costs.

Rural Dignity et al stated that customers perceive directory assistance as a valuable service.  It further postulated that the size of the print in directories may be responsible for a portion of the calls, and that illiterate and visually-impaired subscribers might be reluctant to seek the available exemption.

In reply argument, MT&T submitted that the local directory assistance charge is avoidable, and that the disabled are entitled to an exemption.

At the hearing, the Commission (CRTC) sought clarification of the criteria for exempting certain subscribers from the local directory assistance charge.  Mr. Farmer and Mr. G. Geldert, Vice-president, Operations, indicated that illiterate persons would be eligible for an exemption, in addition to those customers with a permanent disability.  The company indicated that it would revise its tariffs accordingly, and is directed to file, by 21 January 1991, proposed tariff pages providing for that change.

The Commission approves the proposed directory assistance charges, in light of its determination regarding the company's revenue requirement for 1991.  The Commission notes that local directory assistance, while a monopoly service, is also a discretionary service, and that up to 100 requests to long distance directory assistance in the U.S.A. may be made per NES (network exchange service) each month, without charge.

–  Source: CRTC archive
    http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/1990/DT90-30.HTM




1990 December 20

Enhanced 911 Service

Telecom Decision CRTC 90-30
Section II-D: Enhanced 911 Service

Ottawa, 20 December 1990
Telecom Decision CRTC 90-30

MT&T indicated in its annual construction program review (CPR) documentation that it intends to implement province-wide Enhanced 911 Service.  911 Service establishes a single number through which all emergency-related telephone calls are routed to the appropriate emergency agency.  Enhanced 911 Service automatically identifies the location of the caller.

Currently, 911 Service is available in only one community in Nova Scotia.  In that case, the community paid the company to implement the service and operates the service itself.

Province-wide Enhanced 911 Service is planned as a joint project with the Province of Nova Scotia.  On 17 October 1990, MT&T filed the agreement between itself and the Province for the approval of the Commission (CRTC).


The responsibilities of MT&T include:
•  (1) to design, operate and maintain a single province-wide 911 facilities network,
•  (2) to assist in the design of the civic address program, and
•  (3) to design, operate and maintain a customer record system and a 911 information system. 

The responsibilities of the Province include:
•  (1) to design, implement, operate, maintain and control a universal province-wide civic address number system, and
•  (2) to design, implement, maintain and control a universal standard for the answering, dispatching and handling of emergency services.

Each party will assume responsibility for the operating expenses associated with the activities assigned to it under the agreement.


MT&T stated that Enhanced 911 is a new service that would be provided as part of basic telephone service, and that it would benefit the entire customer base.  MT&T stated that its expenses associated with the project would be $328,800 in 1991.

MT&T's proposed approach for providing 911 Service differs from that taken in the operating territories of other telephone companies under the Commission's jurisdiction.  The Province and MT&T have reached an agreement for the provision of Enhanced 911 Service in a comprehensive and cost-effective manner.  However, MT&T is including some of the expenses associated with providing Enhanced 911 Service in its overall revenue requirement, rather than charging the Province for the total cost.

While the Commission has some concerns that MT&T proposes to include some of the expenses associated with Enhanced 911 Service in its revenue requirement, the Commission considers the cost per subscriber minimal, and therefore not unreasonable.  The Commission notes that all subscribers will have access to Enhanced 911 and will therefore benefit from the service.  Furthermore, the provincial government is responsible for a portion of the operating costs.

The Commission concludes that MT&T's proposed approach for the provision of Enhanced 911 Service with the province of Nova Scotia is in the public interest.  Accordingly, the Commission approves MT&T's proposals for the provision of Enhanced 911 Service jointly with the Province of Nova Scotia, as set out in the agreement filed on 17 October 1990.

–  Source: CRTC archive
    http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/1990/DT90-30.HTM




1992 June 12

Effects of Competition in the Provision of
Long Distance Voice Telephone Services

Telecom Decision CRTC 92-12

Ottawa, 12 June 1992
Telecom Decision CRTC 92-12

This Decision includes a long, detailed discussion of many complicated effects of the introduction of competition into the public long-distance telephone service.  Most of these considerations will impact consumers directly.  For example:
•  Number Portability (including 800 and 900 Number Portability)
•  Numbering Plan in Canada
•  The provision of operator assistance for special services such as collect calls and calls charged to a third party (with the possibility that the billed-to number is serviced by a different company), or an account card (perhaps issued by a different company)...
•  Directory Assistance. Who provides directory assistance for a customer of one company who wants the phone number of someone who is a customer of a different company?  This could be further complicated if the inquirer does not know which phone company serves the intended destination...
•  Pay telephones.  For example, should two or more telephone companies competing in the same area be allowed to install their own pay telephones in the same area, possibly generating confusion among users?
•  Providing 911 service to pay phones, especially if some pay phones do not have a telephone number...

The following brief excerpt from this CRTC document may give an indication of the knotty problems that arise when different companies are involved in the handling of a single long-distance call:

MT&T and Island Tel argued that Unitel must assume responsibility for billing all long distance calls carried over its facilities regardless of who places them.  AGT, Bell, B.C. Tel, MT&T and Island Tel denied any obligation to bill and collect for a competitor.  MT&T and Island Tel might voluntarily negotiate a billing services agreement; Bell and AGT do not consider it an attractive business opportunity, and Newfoundland Tel rejected it completely.  AGT noted that, under Unitel's proposal, the non-respondent telephone companies would be providing such a service without direct compensation.  B.C. Tel stated that it considers its billing and collection systems integral to its operations and public image.  B.C. Tel stated that it would not wish to respond to queries and complaints resulting from use of its billing system by others.  MT&T and Island Tel envisaged many problems with Unitel's proposal, citing several specific examples...

–  Source: CRTC archive
    http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/1992/DT92-12.htm





1995 September 6

MT&T “Acadia Advantage” Strategic Partner

Working with Black & McDonald and Nortel, as well as Acadia's other strategic partners, MT&T is wiring all university buildings, with fibre optic cable linked to digital switching equipment.  This network will carry extensive voice and data services including MT&T's Sympatico Internet access service, voice mail and electronic mail.  All university rooms will have telephone service, and MT&T is also offering special distance calling packages.  Through this network, Acadia's staff and students will access global information as quickly and efficiently as they do each other.  These services will strengthen both academic and technology skills, provide a more efficient operating environment and provide a foundation for more advanced services, for skills training and for collaborative research.  MT&T is pleased to partner with Acadia and with IBM in this technology adventure.  We salute Acadia's vision and we are proud to be part of the "Acadia Advantage"...

The Wayback Machine has an archived copy
of this news release:
MT&T “Acadia Advantage” Strategic Partner
Release date: September 6, 1995

Archived: 1997 January 25
http://replay.waybackmachine.org/19970125132437/http://www.mtt.ca/acadia.html





1996 March 1

Introduction of “888” Toll-Free Numbers

When the very first 800 number was given out back in the early 1960's, no one dreamed the we would ever run out of numbers.  How could we possibly go through 7.6 million combinations?  But now, to put it simply, we are running out of toll-free 800 numbers.  By April 1996, virtually all of North America's 7.6 million 800 numbers will be in use.  To avoid a possible toll-free number shortage, a new toll-free access code, 888, will be introduced across North America effective March 1, 1996...

In the last decade, the demand for 1-800 numbers has increased ten fold.  The explosion of pagers, personal 800 numbers, the poularity of vanity numbers and the portability of 800 numbers have all contributed to the depletion of 800 numbers.  Toll-free numbers have become such indespensible tools that the Industry Numbering Committee (INC) predicts all 7.6 million 800 numbers are likely to be assigned or in use by spring 1996.

So, the INC had to develop a contingency plan to deal with the dwindling stock of 800 numbers.  888 became the answer – it's easy to remember and was readily available.  And if we run out again, the service access codes 877, 866, 855, 844, 833, 822 have been reserved for future use...

The Wayback Machine has an archived copy
of this news release:
Introduction of “888” Toll-Free Numbers
Release date: November 10, 1995

Archived: 1997 January 25
http://replay.waybackmachine.org/19970125132509/http://www.mtt.ca/tollfree.html

Related information:

Archived: 1996 Nov 11    Introducing Toll-free 888
http://replay.waybackmachine.org/19961111154056/http://www.mtt.ca/888intro.htm

Archived: 1996 Nov 11    What is 888?
http://replay.waybackmachine.org/19961111154142/http://www.mtt.ca/888fact1.htm

Archived: 1996 Nov 11    We have run out of 1-800 numbers?
http://replay.waybackmachine.org/19961111154151/http://www.mtt.ca/888fact2.htm

Archived: 1996 Nov 11    888 and 800 numbers both Toll-Free
http://replay.waybackmachine.org/19961111154158/http://www.mtt.ca/888fact3.htm

Archived: 1996 Nov 11    Not every 800 and 888 equivalent...
http://replay.waybackmachine.org/19961111154205/http://www.mtt.ca/888fact4.htm

Archived: 1996 Nov 11    How Do I Get an 888 Number?
http://replay.waybackmachine.org/19961111154212/http://www.mtt.ca/888fact5.htm





1996 April 1

911 Service spreading through Nova Scotia

911 Service now for
Colchester, Cumberland Counties
and East Hants


Halifax, Nova Scotia, March 22, 1996 — The next major step in providing provincewide 911 service is only days away, as 911 becomes available to residents in the counties of Cumberland, Colchester and the Municipality of East Hants effective April 1st.  911 service is already in operation in Kings County, where the service was implemented for a three-year trial....

The schedule for completion of the 911 project is as follows:
•  Region 1 - Colchester, Cumberland, East Hants: April 1, 1996
•  Region 2 - Queens, Shelburne, Yarmouth, Digby, Annapolis: April-June 1996
•  Region 3 - Pictou, Antigonish, Guysborough: April-June 1996
•  Region 4 - Halifax, Hants West, Lunenburg: July-September 1996
•  Region 5 - Inverness, Richmond, Victoria, Cape Breton: Oct.-Dec. 1996



Operators

Remarks by Colin Latham
President and CEO, MT&T

* I'd particularly like to pay special tribute to a group that has been providing emergency services pretty much since the invention of the telephone – our operators.

* People have always dialed zero in times of trouble.  Thanks to the quick efforts of operators, hundreds of lives have been saved.

* Take Gerri Moore, one of our operators.  Last fall, she received letters within two months from two different customers crediting her with saving their lives.  In both cases, she not only contacted ambulance services, in one case she also contacted the caller's daughter, and in both cases she stayed on the line with the callers to reassure them until help arrived.

* That kind of spirit of service is the legacy our operators have provided the 911 system.  911 calls placed from cell phones will still go to our operators and they are also an important part of our backup plans...


The Wayback Machine has archived copies
of this news release:
911 Service for
Colchester, Cumberland Counties
and East Hants

Release date: March 22, 1996

Archived: 1996 November 11
http://web.archive.org/web/19961111153658/www.mtt.ca/911.html

Archived: 1997 January 25
http://web.archive.org/web/19970125132605/http://www.mtt.ca/911.html





1996 November 11

MT&T and Bragg reach agreement in principle

News release: November 11, 1996
(HALIFAX, NS) – MT&T and the Bragg Cable Group announced today they have reached an agreement in principle to form a new company which would link the telephone company and cable company networks together.

At a meeting earlier today, the Board of Directors of MT&T unanimously approved the concept and established an independent committee of Directors to review and validate the proposal and make recommendations to the Board.

High speed, two-way telecommunications requires tremendous line capacity – commonly called 'broadband telecommunications'.  Telephone companies and cable companies acting alone, are years away from being able to provide this technology down every street and into every home and workplace.

The MT&T/Bragg joint venture, would operate in new product areas only.  Its first products and services are expected to be launched in 1997.

The first product to be offered by the new company would be internet service at speeds up to 20 times greater than available on regular telephone lines.  This product would combine MT&T's popular Sympatico internet service delivered directly to homes and offices through the modern cable network serviced by the Bragg Cable Group.  Amherst, Bridgewater, Halifax, New Glasgow, Sydney, and Truro would be among the earliest communities to receive this new service.

This is not a merger of MT&T and Bragg Cable Group.  Each would continue to operate their traditional services independently and would compete with each other when appropriate.

The new agreement would result in MT&T and Bragg Cable Group exchanging a minority interest in each other.  MT&T would acquire 29.9% of the shares of Bragg and in exchange, the Bragg organization would receive approximately 6% of the shares of MT&T.

The agreement is also subject to regulatory approvals and due diligence.




Backgrounder on MT&T

•  Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited is an investor owned telecommunications company, based in Halifax.

•  The Company owns 100% of Maritime Tel and Tel Limited, (Nova Scotia's telecommunications company,) and MT&T Mobility Incorporated.

•  MT&T has an investment of 52% in the Island Telephone Company Limited, (Prince Edward Island's major telecommunications utility.)

•  At September 30, 1996, the Company had 711.4 thousand network access services (telephone lines in service.)

•  Consolidated revenues were $568.4 million in 1995, up 4% over the previous year and $443 million, up 3.5%, for the first nine months of 1996.

•  At September 30, 1996, the Company had $1.98 billion of telecommunications property and total shareholders equity of $538.1 million.

•  There are approximately 29 million common shares outstanding (excluding the agreement with the Bragg organization.)




Backgrounder on Bragg Cable Group

•  Bragg Cable Group is a private organization, based in Oxford, Nova Scotia, controlled by the Bragg family.

•  Bragg Cable Group wholly owns cable companies in the following areas: Truro, Amherst, Springhill, Aylesford, Middleton, Berwick, Bridgewater, Lunenburg, Chester, Mahone Bay, Antigonish, Sydney, Windsor, New Glasgow (Nova Scotia); Summerside (PEI), Sackville (New Brunswick) - a total of 88,724 subscribers.

•  The Group directly and indirectly owns 66.25% of the cable companies in Halifax, Shelburne, Liverpool and Yarmouth (Nova Scotia) - a total of 63,315 subscribers.

•  The Company owns 25% of the cable companies serving Dartmouth, Kentville, Digby (Nova Scotia) and Sussex (New Brunswick.)

•  About 60% of cable subscribers in Nova Scotia are located in areas served by the Bragg Cable Group.

•  The Bragg Cable Group network includes a number of modern high technology systems.  Halifax Cable for example, has virtually completed a 750 MHz system with two-way capability and 500 home nodes.

•  New 450 MHz systems are in final construction stages in most other areas controlled by Bragg including Sydney, Bridgewater, Truro, New Glasgow, Springhill, Amherst, Aylesford, Middleton, Berwick, Blockhouse, Lunenburg, Chester, Mahone Bay and others.

•  These state of the art platforms, combined with MT&T's switching capability and fibre optic/digital network will be exceptionally capable of providing broadband services to homes, institutions and businesses.




Backgrounder on the Agreement between
Bragg Cable Group and MT&T

•  MT&T would purchase 29.9% of the equity of Bragg Cable Group.  In exchange, the Bragg organization would receive approximately 1,875,000 MT&T common shares, to be issued by the Company's treasury - valued at $24.15 per share – the TSE market price on November 1, 1996.  There is no cash involved in the transaction.

•  Purchase price is based on ten times 1996/1997 operating earnings less debt (29.9% share) of Bragg Cable Group.  This is earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization.

•  The Bragg organization would receive an additional $4 million in MT&T stock if the stock reaches $28.00 per share within three years and a further $4 million in stock if it reaches $32.00 per share within five years.

•  The two companies agree to form a joint venture company, owned on a 50/50 basis, to deal with the deployment of internet and other interactive multimedia applications as mutually determined.  MT&T would finance, on a commercial basis, $50 million over a five to ten year period to the joint venture, for expenditure on systems infrastructure.  MT&T would be reimbursed by the new company for its financing costs.

•  MT&T would appoint two representatives to the Board of Bragg Cable Group.  The Bragg organization would nominate one representative to the Board of MT&T.

•  This agreement is unique in that it provides for an ongoing joint venture on new services between a telephony utility and a cable company in the same territory.

Through the success of the joint venture, the value of the agreement would be substantially in excess of a typical cable company purchase.

–  Source:
    http://web.archive.org/web/19970125131929/www.mtt.ca/announce.html





1996 December 9

911 Now Available in Halifax County

On this day, 911 emergency number service became effective throughout the rural areas of the County of Halifax, that is all areas outside of the (former) Cities of Halifax and Dartmouth and the Town of Bedford.  The same service also became effective this day for the Towns of Bridgewater, Lunenburg, and Mahone Bay, in Lunenburg County.  Residents of the Town of Bedford "have had 911 for years" prior to this date.  Halifax and Dartmouth residents "will continue to dial 4105 for police emergencies and 4103 for fire emergencies".  911 emergency number service became effective in Cumberland and Colchester Counties in April 1996.
[The Halifax Chronicle-Herald, 10 December 1996]



1996 December 18

MT&&T Board approves joint venture
with Bragg Cable Group

December 18, 1996
(HALIFAX, NS) – The Board of Directors of Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited today approved the previously announced joint venture with Bragg Cable Group.  The approval follows a unanimous recommendation from an independent committee of the Board of Directors and is subject to due diligence, regulatory review and conclusion of the necessary legal agreements.
–  Source:
    http://web.archive.org/web/19970125131858/http://www.mtt.ca/





1996 December 31

MT&T Network Facts

Number of exchanges – 175
Percentage of digital lines – 94%
Percentage of analog lines – 6%
Number of single party customers – 716,521
Number of multi party customers – 5,186
Number of customers converted to single party service in 1996 – 2,941
Total kilometres of fibre optic cable – 4,800
Number of cell sites – 90

[Source: http://www.mtt.ca/AboutMTT/Profile/NetworkFacts/]




1997 February 1

New Call Guardian Service

On 1 February 1997, MT&T introduced a "new free Call Minder service, called Call Guardian®", according to a bill stuffer sent out with the January 1997 bills.  Depending on the options chosen by the subscriber, "Guardian® will prevent long distance or 1-900 calls from being placed" from, "and can prevent long distance calls from being billed" to, a subscriber's telephone.  Call Guardian® includes, at the subscriber's option, any combination of one or more of these three services:

  Toll Restrict blocks outgoing calls beginning with the digit "1", except 1-800 and 1-888 calls, and can also block calls beginning with "0" (Operator and Calling Card calls);
  Collect & Third Number prevents Collect and Third Number calls from being charged to the subscriber's telephone number; and
  No-900 prevents calls to 1-900 services from being placed from the subscriber's telephone number.

"Call Guardian® service is ideal for parents wanting to manage their children's calling, people sharing accomodations, or for small businesses and social clubs concerned about calls being made from telephones located in publicly-accessible areas."  The same stuffer announced that "MT&T is reducing the rate of interest charged on late-paid accounts from 1.25% per month (16.1% per year) to 1.00% per month (12.7% per year).  Also, MT&T is increasing the unpaid amount threshold for this charge from $20 to $22.  These changes will mean that fewer customers will have to pay, and/or those who pay may pay less.  Note: the minimum charge of $1.25 remains in effect."  [That last sentence was printed in a markedly smaller typeface than the rest of the announcement.]




1997 February 1

Private Contractors Now Allowed
to Install Telephone Lines

MT&T mailed out, as a stuffer in its February 1997 bills, a leaflet with the following:

"As of February 1, 1997, MT&T residence and single-line business customers are able to choose which company installs telephone wires and jacks inside their home or business... People can now hire MT&T, a private installation contractor, or even do the work themselves.  Before this change, only MT&T had been authorized to carry out this type of work.  MT&T will continue to offer this service.  Charges will include the cost of a visit to the customer's location plus parts and labour.  MT&T will also still provide repairs to inside telephone wiring and jacks associated with normal 'wear and tear' at no cost.  However, any repairs which come as the result of customer action will continue to be charged, as they are today...  Q: How can I be sure about getting the job done right?  A: MT&T has produced an installation manual to ensure that all necessary standards are met.  For the 'do it yourself person', MT&T offers a detailed wiring guide for assistance.  Copies can be picked up at any Authorized MT&T Distributor in Nova Scotia..."




Comment (written 6 July 2010):  Nowadays this may not sound like a big deal, but at the time this was a huge, wrenching departure from the way business had been done for the entire lifetime of everyone then working in the telephone industry.  From time immemorial, it was unthinkable that anyone, other than a trained employee of the telephone company, would be allowed to do any kind of work that affected any telephone equipment, business or residential.  “Before this change, only MT&T had been authorized to carry out this type of work.” This enormous change of a long-standing polcy was bitterly fought throughout the telephone industry, and was deeply resented among company managers who for many decades had been used to having the company's rules and policies put into effect without any need to consider what the company's customers might think.





1997 March 31

MT&T Holds 83% of Long Distance Market

MT&T estimated that it had about an 83% share of the long distance market (long distance calls originating in Nova Scotia) at 31 March 1997, compared to 84% at 31 December 1996.
—  Source: Comments delivered 29 April 1997 by Ron Smith, MT&T Vice President Finance and Corporate Services, to financial analysts after release of financial results for first quarter 1997.




1997 March 31

MT&T Gains Additional Revenue
$700,000 in Three Months
from "Always On" Services

Revenues from enhanced optional services grew at a rate of about 12% in 1997 compared to 1996.  This growth was driven by the introduction of new services such as TalkMail and by new billing options such as Always On.  Always On, which MT&T didn't have a year ago, generated over $700,000 during the first quarter of 1997.
[Source: Comments delivered 29 April 1997 by Ron Smith, MT&T Vice President Finance and Corporate Services, to financial analysts after release of financial results for first quarter 1997.]



"Always On" Services
Always On is a group of Call Minder features that are always available to all MT&T residential customers.  There is a 35¢ charge for each use, up to a maximum of $7.00 per month; except there is no charge for Call Block and Call Trace.  There is no requirement to formally subscribe to any of these services – MT&T has installed them and they can be used at any time by any telephone customer (except those on party lines, or with rotary-dial phones, or a few other restrictions that apply only to a small minority of customers).

  Call Return (*69) Answers the question: "Who called me last?" Pick up the receiver, and press "*69" (star-six-nine).  An automated voice will read to you the digits of the phone number from which the last call was made incoming to your telephone.  This will be the last incoming call, whether the call was answered or not.  After the digits have been read to you, if you like you can return the call be pressing "1" (one) when prompted.  Call Return works on all incoming calls, both local and long distance.

  Ring Again (*66) "I need to reach that busy number." This feature will ensure you get through to that busy number as soon as it becomes free, without you having to do repeated redialling.  If you reach a busy signal, hang up, then pick up the receiver and press "*66" (star-six-six), and hang up.  You can program Ring Again for more than one number at a time, and you can place and receive calls as usual while Ring Again is activated.  Ring Again will not interrupt you if you are on another call.  If you want to cancel a Ring Again request, press "*86" (star-eight-six).

 Three Way Calling "Let's get Harry on the line, too."  Planning a party?  Need to discuss a business matter?  Just want to talk to two friends at once?  Three Way Calling lets you add a third party to your existing conversation.  To do so, press your link, flash, or switch-hook button and wait for three tones.  Then key in the number of the third party.  When they answer, press the button again and you will be in a three-way conversation.  If the third party does not answer or the line is busy, press the button again to return to the original caller.  Either of the persons you called can hang up at any time without cancelling the remaining two connected phones.  Any long distance charges incurred will be billed to your phone, that is to the phone which sets up the three-way call.

[ICS – I've no idea what the "link" or "flash" buttons may be, and the phone company's instructions do not explain them.  It's just a guess, but I think the "switch-hook button" refers to what I've known for decades as the cradle switch.]

[Google found this lurking in a dusty corner of the Internet]:  Almost all telephones have a button that says "Flash" but I don't know anyone who actually uses it.  What does it mean?   A:  It's used for making conference calls.  I use it all the time talking to all my friends on the phone all together.  First you call somebody and have them stay on the line and then touch Flash and dial another number and that person would be included in the call.  You could add as many people as you wanted to, pressing Flash for each one.

 Name That Number (1-902-555-1313, toll free) Have you ever wanted to find out the name associated with a telephone number?  Name That Number does this for you, for any listed number in the Atlantic Provinces.  Call 1-902-555-1313 toll free, any time.  Voice prompts will guide you to enter the area code (three digits) followed by the phone number (seven digits), and then an automated voice will read to you the name as it is listed in the telephone directory.  You can inquire about two numbers for each 35¢ call.  You will not be charged if no information is available.

 TalkMail (*99) TalkMail is a voice messaging service that enables you to record a spoken message for later delivery to anyone you might make an ordinary telephone call to.  It does not answer your phone – that is, it does not function as an answering machine.  TalkMail is always available once you have set up your mailbox.  You pay 35¢ when you send messages to phones within your local calling region, or applicable long distance rates when you send long distance messages.  There is no charge to the receiving telephone.  You can send messages to anyone with a voice mailbox – on their regular or cellular telephone – in Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, and many other locations within Canada.  TalkMail is often used to send a message when

—  You don't want to disturb the other person (late at night, or dinner time...)
—  The line is busy or they don't answer.
—  You need to call several people at once to deliver the same message (organizing a meeting, or a team practice, changes in trip plans...)

How do you get a message that someone else has recorded to be delivered to you?  When a message is waiting for you, you'll hear an interrupted dial tone when you pick up your phone.  This sound won't prevent you from making or receiving phone calls before you check your messages.  However, you will hear the interrupted tone each time you pick up your phone to dial out, until you review all your new messages.  [There are several details about TalkMail that won't be described here – see any MT&T directory for more complete information.]

 Call Block In areas where Call Display is available, Call Block is provided automatically, free of charge.  Press "*67" (star-six-seven) to block your telephone number, or "*87" (star-eight-seven) to block both your name and number, before placing your call.  Call Block automatically cancels when you hang up your phone at the end of your call – it must be reactivated for each call you make.  Even if you make a call with Call Block activated, Call Trace can still trace calls made from your telephone.  If you have an unlisted (non-published) phone number, your number is already permanently blocked by MT&T – only your name will display when you call someone who has call Display.  If you have a non-published phone number, do not use *67 or *87 – if you do use these codes, your phone number will be displayed at the receiving telephone.

 Call Trace (*57) If you receive an obscene or threatening phone call, follow these steps:
—  1. Hang up immediately.
—  2. Pick up the receiver and listen for the dial tone.
—  3. Dial "*57" (star-five-seven).
—  4. A recorded message will tell you whether or not the call was traced to the originating telephone.
—  5. Hang up.
—  6. Note the date and time of the call and contact the local police if you want to take action against the caller.  Trace information will be released by MT&T only to law enforcement officials.
Call Trace is provided automatically free of charge, where Call Minder services are available.


The above is only a brief summary of the various "smart telephone" options available at this time in Nova Scotia.  For more information, refer to any MT&T phone directory.
[Source: MT&T Telephone Directories, 1997]




Reference: MT&T Call Minder Services

Archived: 1998 January 27
http://replay.waybackmachine.org/19980127095014/http://www.mtt.ca/AtHome/
    Products/Convenience/CallMinderServices.html




1997 June

MT&T mailed out, as a stuffer in its June 1997 bills, a leaflet with the following:

A proposal has been submitted to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) "that would make most 'local' calling areas bigger than ever before.  If approved, every call you make to a neighbouring telephone exchange will be a local call.  Long distance charges will no longer apply.  The only requirement will be that the exchange (you are calling to) must border directly on your exchange.  If approved, larger local calling areas will be introduced" one exchange at a time, "starting 1 October 1997.  Conversion is expected to be complete by the end of 1998."




1997 October

October 1997

List of All Telephone Exchanges in Nova Scotia


At this time, all local telephone service was supplied by MT&T,
thus all of these exchanges were owned and operated by MT&T.

Numerical Order Alphabetic Order
221 Halifax Cellular
224 Cheticamp
226 Arichat
227 Port Hawkesbury
Cellular
228 Blandford
232 Monastery
234 Monastery
235 Margaree Harbour
243 Pugwash
245 Digby
247 Digby Cellular
248 Margaree Forks
249 Digby Cellular
251 River Hebert
254 Parrsboro
257 Wallace
258 Inverness
261 Maitland
267 Halifax
275 Chester
279 Chester Cellular
285 Ingonish
295 Baddeck

328 Country Harbour
336 Neil's Harbour
345 Louisdale
347 Ecum Secum
348 Port Greville
350 Liverpool Cellular
351 River John
354 Liverpool
358 Queensport
362 Kennetcook
364 Port Bickerton
366 Canso
369 Noel
379 Eskasoni
383 Dingwall
384 Musquodoboit
386 Heatherton
387 Goldboro
392 Advocate
396 Westville

420 Halifax
421 Halifax
422 Halifax
423 Halifax
424 Halifax
425 Halifax
426 Halifax
427 Halifax
428 Halifax
429 Halifax
434 Dartmouth
435 Dartmouth
443 Halifax
445 Halifax
447 Oxford
450 Halifax
451 Halifax
452 Halifax Cellular
453 Halifax
454 Halifax
455 Halifax
456 Halifax Cellular
457 Halifax
458 Paging
459 Paging
460 Dartmouth
461 Dartmouth
462 Dartmouth
463 Dartmouth
464 Dartmouth
465 Dartmouth
466 Dartmouth
467 Bear River
468 Dartmouth
469 Dartmouth
471 Halifax Cellular
473 Halifax
474 Halifax
475 Halifax
477 Halifax
479 Halifax
481 Dartmouth
483 Halifax Paging
484 Halifax
485 Pictou
486 MT&T
487 MT&T
488 Halifax Cellular
489 Halifax Cellular
490 Halifax
491 Halifax
492 Halifax
493 Halifax
494 Halifax
495 Halifax
496 Halifax
497 Halifax Cellular
498 Halifax Paging
499 Halifax Cellular

521 Bridgewater Cellular
522 Sherbrooke
525 Larry's River
527 Bridgewater
528 Walton
529 Bridgewater Cellular
532 Annapolis Royal
533 Guysborough
534 Kentville
535 St. Peters
538 Berwick
539 Sydney
541 Bridgewater
542 Wolfville
543 Bridgewater
544 Sydney Mines
545 Maccan
546 Southampton
547 Springfield
548 Wentworth
551 Paging
558 Paging
559 Halifax
560 Sydney Cellular
561 Sydney Cellular
562 Sydney
563 Sydney
564 Sydney
565 Sydney Cellular
567 Sydney Paging
568 Upper Musquodoboit
582 Canning
584 Lawrencetown
585 Wolfville
587 L'Ardoise
592 New Waterford
595 Sydney
597 Springhill

622 Grand Narrows
623 Port Hawkesbury
Cellular
624 Mahone Bay
625 Port Hawkesbury
627 Western Shore
630 Barrington Cellular
632 Clarksville
633 Cheverie
634 Lunenburg
637 Barrington
638 Cornwallis
639 Stewiacke
642 Liverpool Cellular
643 Argyle
644 New Germany
645 Meteghan
646 Port Mouton
647 Bass River
648 Tusket
649 Port Maitland
654 Port Dufferin
656 Lockeport
657 Tatamagouche
661 Amherst
662 Debert
663 Wedgeport
664 Amherst
665 Bridgetown
667 Amherst
668 Great Village
669 Amherst Cellular
670 Kentville Cellular
671 Upper Stewiacke
673 Brookfield
674 Boularderie
677 Mill Village
678 Kentville
679 Kentville
680 Kentville Cellular
681 New Minas
682 Caledonia
683 Port Mouton
684 Hantsport
685 Chelsea
686 Collingwood
688 LaHave
689 New Ross
690 Kentville
692 Kentville Cellular

723 Woods Harbour
725 lona
727 Marion Bridge
733 Louisbourg
736 Sydney Mines
737 Port Morien
740 Yarmouth Cellular
742 Yarmouth
745 Clark's Harbour
746 Yarmouth Cellular
747 Mulgrave
749 Yarmouth
750 Shubenacadie Cellular
752 New Glasgow
753 New Glasgow
755 New Glasgow
756 Whycocomagh
757 Brooklyn
758 Shubenacadie
759 New Glasgow Cellular
760 New Glasgow Cellular
761 Carleton
762 Pubnico
765 Kingston
766 Riverport
768 Port LaTour
769 Saulnierville
771 New Glasgow Cellular
772 Tangier
773 Saulnierville Cellular
779 Liscomb
783 Goshen
787 Port Hood
790 Windsor
792 Windsor
794 North Sydney
798 Windsor
799 Windsor Cellular

822 East Bay
823 French Village
825 Middleton
826 St. Margarets
827 Chezzetcook
828 East Bay
829 Dartmouth
832 Bedford
833 Melrose
834 Sandy Cove
835 Bedford
837 Weymouth
839 Freeport
842 Glace Bay
845 Lake Charlotte
847 Aylesford
849 Glace Bay
852 Prospect Road
857 Hubbards
860 Waverley
861 Waverley
862 New Waterford
863 Antigonish
864 Sackville
865 Sackville
866 Mount Uniacke
867 Antigonish
868 Ketch Harbour
869 Sackville
870 Antigonish Cellular
871 Boisdale
872 Antigonish
873 Waverley
875 Shelburne
876 Halifax
878 Musquodoboit Harbour
Cellular
879 Shelburne Cellular
883 Elmsdale
884 Gabarus
885 Sheet Harbour
889 Musquodoboit Harbour
890 Truro Cellular
893 Truro
895 Truro
896 Truro Cellular
897 Truro
898 Truro Cellular
899 Truro Cellular

922 Thorburn
923 Hopewell
924 Kenzieville
925 Saltsprings
926 Merigomish
928 Westville
929 St. Ann's Bay
945 Mabou
981 Halifax
392 Advocate
661 Amherst
664 Amherst
667 Amherst
669 Amherst Cellular
532 Annapolis Royal
872 Antigonish
863 Antigonish
867 Antigonish
870 Antigonish Cellular
643 Argyle
226 Arichat
847 Aylesford

295 Baddeck
637 Barrington
630 Barrington Cellular
647 Bass River
467 Bear River
832 Bedford
835 Bedford
538 Berwick
228 Blandford
871 Boisdale
674 Boularderie
665 Bridgetown
527 Bridgewater
541 Bridgewater
543 Bridgewater
521 Bridgewater Cellular
529 Bridgewater Cellular
673 Brookfield
757 Brooklyn

682 Caledonia
582 Canning
366 Canso
761 Carleton
685 Chelsea
275 Chester
279 Chester Cellular
224 Cheticamp
633 Cheverie
827 Chezzetcook
745 Clark's Harbour
632 Clarksville
686 Collingwood
638 Cornwallis
328 Country Harbour

434 Dartmouth
435 Dartmouth
460 Dartmouth
461 Dartmouth
462 Dartmouth
463 Dartmouth
464 Dartmouth
465 Dartmouth
466 Dartmouth
468 Dartmouth
469 Dartmouth
481 Dartmouth
829 Dartmouth
662 Debert
245 Digby
247 Digby Cellular
249 Digby Cellular
383 Dingwall

828 East Bay
822 East Bay
347 Ecum Secum
883 Elmsdale
379 Eskasoni

839 Freeport
823 French Village

884 Gabarus
842 Glace Bay
849 Glace Bay
387 Goldboro
783 Goshen
622 Grand Narrows
668 Great Village
533 Guysborough

267 Halifax
420 Halifax
421 Halifax
422 Halifax
423 Halifax
424 Halifax
425 Halifax
426 Halifax
427 Halifax
428 Halifax
429 Halifax
443 Halifax
445 Halifax
450 Halifax
451 Halifax
453 Halifax
454 Halifax
455 Halifax
457 Halifax
473 Halifax
474 Halifax
475 Halifax
477 Halifax
479 Halifax
484 Halifax
490 Halifax
491 Halifax
492 Halifax
493 Halifax
494 Halifax
495 Halifax
496 Halifax
559 Halifax
876 Halifax
981 Halifax
221 Halifax Cellular
452 Halifax Cellular
456 Halifax Cellular
471 Halifax Cellular
488 Halifax Cellular
489 Halifax Cellular
497 Halifax Cellular
499 Halifax Cellular
483 Halifax Paging
498 Halifax Paging
684 Hantsport
386 Heatherton
923 Hopewell
857 Hubbards

285 Ingonish
258 Inverness
725 lona

362 Kennetcook
534 Kentville
678 Kentville
679 Kentville
690 Kentville
670 Kentville Cellular
680 Kentville Cellular
692 Kentville Cellular
924 Kenzieville
868 Ketch Harbour
765 Kingston

688 LaHave
845 Lake Charlotte
587 L'Ardoise
525 Larry's River
584 Lawrencetown
779 Liscomb
354 Liverpool
350 Liverpool Cellular
642 Liverpool Cellular
656 Lockeport
733 Louisbourg
345 Louisdale
634 Lunenburg

945 Mabou
545 Maccan
624 Mahone Bay
261 Maitland
248 Margaree Forks
235 Margaree Harbour
727 Marion Bridge
833 Melrose
926 Merigomish
645 Meteghan
825 Middleton
677 Mill Village
232 Monastery
234 Monastery
866 Mount Uniacke
486 MT&T
487 MT&T
747 Mulgrave
384 Musquodoboit
889 Musquodoboit Harbour
878 Musquodoboit Harbour
Cellular

336 Neil's Harbour
644 New Germany
752 New Glasgow
753 New Glasgow
755 New Glasgow
759 New Glasgow Cellular
760 New Glasgow Cellular
771 New Glasgow Cellular
681 New Minas
689 New Ross
592 New Waterford
862 New Waterford
369 Noel
794 North Sydney

447 Oxford

458 Paging
459 Paging
551 Paging
558 Paging

254 Parrsboro
485 Pictou
364 Port Bickerton
654 Port Dufferin
348 Port Greville
625 Port Hawkesbury
227 Port Hawkesbury
Cellular
623 Port Hawkesbury
Cellular
787 Port Hood
768 Port LaTour
649 Port Maitland
737 Port Morien
646 Port Mouton
683 Port Mouton
852 Prospect Road
762 Pubnico
243 Pugwash

358 Queensport

251 River Hebert
351 River John
766 Riverport

864 Sackville
865 Sackville
869 Sackville
929 St. Ann's Bay
826 St. Margarets
535 St. Peters
925 Saltsprings
834 Sandy Cove
769 Saulnierville
773 Saulnierville Cellular
885 Sheet Harbour
875 Shelburne
879 Shelburne Cellular
522 Sherbrooke
758 Shubenacadie
750 Shubenacadie Cellular
546 Southampton
547 Springfield
597 Springhill
639 Stewiacke
539 Sydney
562 Sydney
563 Sydney
564 Sydney
595 Sydney
560 Sydney Cellular
561 Sydney Cellular
565 Sydney Cellular
567 Sydney Paging
544 Sydney Mines
736 Sydney Mines

772 Tangier
657 Tatamagouche
922 Thorburn
893 Truro
895 Truro
897 Truro
890 Truro Cellular
896 Truro Cellular
898 Truro Cellular
899 Truro Cellular
648 Tusket

568 Upper Musquodoboit
671 Upper Stewiacke

257 Wallace
528 Walton
860 Waverley
861 Waverley
873 Waverley
663 Wedgeport
548 Wentworth
627 Western Shore
396 Westville
928 Westville
837 Weymouth
756 Whycocomagh
790 Windsor
792 Windsor
798 Windsor
799 Windsor Cellular
542 Wolfville
585 Wolfville
723 Woods Harbour

742 Yarmouth
749 Yarmouth
740 Yarmouth Cellular
746 Yarmouth Cellular

Source: MT&T telephone directory
"Annapolis Valley East"
issued 24 November 1997.

284 exchanges, all told.


Note: Exchange 221, then under construction but not in operation, was included in this list (above) printed in October 1997.  The following is excerpted from a brief item that appeared in the Halifax Chronicle-Herald, 10 June 1998:

MT&T launched a new local cellular prefix, 221, in metro Halifax yesterday.  The move is in response to growing demand for new cell phone service with MT&T Mobility, the company said in a media release.  "Every time we open another block of cellular telephone numbers, that's another 10,000 customers we can accommodate on our provincewide cellular network," said Chuck Hartlen, MT&T Mobility's network services director.  At the current rate (of issuing of new cell phone numbers) we'll most likely have to launch another new cellular prefix by October 1998," Mr. Hartlen said.  MT&T also announced cell phone users heading to Kejimkujik National Park this summer will have service in the area.  New cellular sites have been installed in Kejimkujik and Caledonia, Queens County...




1998

MT&T Quality of Service Indicators



It's a good question.

How do you measure quality, in the services industry?

How can you get an objective measure of the quality of a service?

For example, how can you get an objective measure of the quality of the service supplied by a telephone company?

The CRTC has decided it, and the public, need good, solid, reliable information about the quality of service supplied by the various telephone companies.  It has developed a method (they call it a monitoring model) called the Quality of Service reporting requirements which can be used to obtain such information.

CRTC:   MT&T Quality of Service Indicators, 1998 The most fundamental of these quality indicators is 3.1, Dial Tone Delay.  The reported number is the percentage of attempted calls experiencing dial tone delay of three seconds or less, during the company's busiest hour of the month.
   http://ns1758.ca/tele/teleph20.html



1998 April 28

End of the Telephone Company

On 28 April 1998, MT&T president Colin Latham declared the end of the phone company.  On this day, he told MT&T's annual shareholders meeting it is moving to diversify into an "electronic-services company," evident by his announcement of a $6-million investment in four Nova Scotian high-tech firms.  "Shareholders who have placed their trust in MT&T now hold an investment in a... company with a varied product base in communications, information, transaction and entertainment," Latham told 552 shareholders and guests gathered at the World Trade Centre in Halifax.

Before the meeting, Latham said MT&T will invest $3,000,000 in TecKnowledge Healthcare Systems of Dartmouth, $1,500,000 in Salter Street Media, a subsidiary of Halifax-based Salter Street Films Ltd., $1,000,000 in Brooklyn North Software Works Inc. of Halifax and $375,000 in InfoInterActive Inc. of Bedford.  For these investments, MT&T will gain equity positions in all four firms, ranging from 37.5% in Salter New Media to 11.5% in InfoInterActive.

TecKnowledge is linking every hospital in the province to provide support to patients, physicians and communities in rural Nova Scotia. The project will be completed in March 1999.  Company president and co-founder Dorothy Spence said the infusion of cash will help TecKnowledge grow and expand its marketing opportunities across Canada and around the world.  Spence said the company is "actively recruiting" employees but finds itself stressed by its dual needs. Potential workers must have health-care training and computer skills.  "The good news is we're really niche.  The bad news is we're really niche in finding those people," she said.

Long Distance Revenue Down $19,000,000
for Year 1997


Shareholders hardly flinched as Ron Smith, the company's chief financial officer, described the accounting changes that resulted in a one-time, after-tax charge of $189,000,000 that left the company with a $135,000,000 loss for 1997.  "While the charge had no effect on important items like cash flow, dividends, employment levels, prices or our credit rating, it did have a distorting effect on our books" Smith said.  Smith went on, however, to paint a rosy picture of company finances, all expressed "before the extraordinary charge" was taken in account.  Net income in 1997 was up 17% from the previous year to $56,000,000.  This was despite a $19,000,000 drop in long-distance revenue, most of which was attributed to rate reductions MT&T introduced in the last quarter of 1997 to hold customers tempted by a plethora of long-distance providers.  Smith steeled shareholders to more bad news in this competitive front.  "We expect long-distance revenues will continue to decline because prices will continue to fall," he said.

In his own address, Latham said MT&T will be ready to battle long-distance foes and new competitors entering the local-service market.  "Because we are ahead of the curve, there will be no last-minute scrambling... We will remain tightly focused on our strategic plan," he said.

[The Halifax Daily News, 29 April 1998]



1998 June 15

Island Telephone Company Limited
changes name to Island Telecom Inc.


On 7 May 1998, the shareholders of the Island Telephone Company Limited (a subsidiary of Maritime Telegraph & Telephone Company – MT&T owns 52% of the shares of Island Telephone) approved a proposal to change the company's name to Island Telecom Incorporated.  "The Island Telephone Company Limited is a name that has been in existence for most of this century," explained company president & CEO Fred Morash.  "It was an accurate description of our business for most of that time, but we've been working for a long time to expand the business beyond providing just telephone services.  We now offer customers a broad range of the most advanced telecommunications services, and we believe that our new name, Island Telecom Inc., better reflects the business of the company, " he said.  In addition to approving the new name, shareholders previewed a new logo which will support the more modern and timely identity.

The change of name was approved by the CRTC and, on 15 June 1998, the company's name was legally changed to Island Telecom Incorporated.

In May 1998, the Chairman of the Board of Directors of The Island Telephone Company was Colin Latham, who also was President and Chief Executive Officer, Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company, Limited and Maritime Tel & Tel Limited.

[Source: CRTC archive http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/TELECOM/ORDER/1998/O98586_0.TXT]

The Wayback Machine has archived copies of:
CRTC Order 98-586
Island Telephone Company Limited
Island Telecom Incorporated

Archived: 1999 October 04   
http://web.archive.org/web/19991004185526/http://www.crtc.gc.ca/
    eng/TELECOM/ORDER/1998/O98586_0.txt

Archived: 1999 November 10   
http://web.archive.org/web/19991110204546/http://www.crtc.gc.ca/
    eng/TELECOM/ORDER/1998/O98586_0.txt





1999 March 22

Merger Agreement Achieved


MT&T to be merged with
Three Other Phone Companies
to form AtlanticCo


Atlantic merger will form $3B Company


Merger of
Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Ltd., Bruncor Inc., NewTel Enterprises Ltd. and Island Telecom Inc.


Monday, March 22, 1999
Attention Business Editors: Atlantic merger launches $3B Company with strong growth agenda; “AtlanticCo” creates 3rd largest incumbent telecom, 2nd largest IT group

ST. JOHN'S, HALIFAX, CHARLOTTETOWN, SAINT JOHN, March 22 /CNW/ - Bruncor Inc. (TSE, ME: BRR), Island Telecom Inc. (TSE, ME: IT), Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited (TSE, ME: MTT), and NewTel Enterprises Limited (TSE: NEL), owners of the major IT and provincial telecommunications companies in Atlantic Canada, announced today that they have reached a merger agreement.

With the working name of “AtlanticCo”, the merged company, with a current market capitalization of approximately $3 billion, will be launched as a growth company with four core lines of business: telecommunications, information technology (IT), mobile satellite communications, and emerging business.  The merged company would be one of the largest private sector employers in Atlantic Canada, with about 9,000 employees.

Stephen Wetmore, President & CEO of NewTel Enterprises, will be President & CEO of the new company, and Lino Celeste, Chairman of Bruncor, will be Chairman of the Board of Directors.

Along with Mr. Wetmore, the senior management team includes: Colin Latham, Executive Vice-President, AtlanticCo, and President of the new company's telecommunications division, bringing together the four Atlantic Canada telecommunication companies – NBTel, MT&T, Island Telecom, and NewTel Communications; Gerry Pond, Executive Vice-President, and President, Information Technology and Emerging Business, responsible for IT, mobile satellite communications, and emerging business; Bob Benson, Executive Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer; and Bill Steeves, Vice-President, Corporate Services, heading up the senior transition team.

With total revenues of $1.7 billion in 1998, AtlanticCo's combined resources create the third largest Canadian-owned incumbent telecommunications company, and one of the largest mobile satellite services companies in North America.

“In addition, our combined IT group, with more than 1,800 professionals, will make us the second largest Canadian-owned information technology services operations,” Mr. Wetmore said.  “Our range of investments in emerging businesses and advanced telecommunications, such as ImagicTV and the products generated from NBTel's LivingLAB™ innovations environment, position AtlanticCo for growth in world export markets.”

It is anticipated that shareholder meetings to approve the merger will be held by May 19, with closing set or May 31, 1999.  Shares of the four current public companies will be exchanged for shares in the new company.  BCE Inc. would own about 42 percent of the new company.

An Agenda For Growth


“The reason for this merger is simple: to create an aggressive growth company,” said Mr. Wetmore. “By pooling our assets and resources, AtlanticCo will be greater than the sum of its parts.  This merger builds upon our long history of co-operation, and represents a natural evolution for our companies to secure our future growth.”

That growth, said Mr. Wetmore, will be achieved by focusing on two key strategies.  “We are going to grow by protecting and enhancing the telecom business in our home markets.  This transaction, supported by our strong relationship with Bell Canada and its affiliated companies, will secure our response to increasing national and international competition.”

In addition, the new company has established working agreements with Bell Nexxia, a new company within the Bell Canada Group responsible for national delivery of Internet Protocol products and services.  “This will help us to deliver global reach and leading edge products and services for our customers – both critically important for a company of our size.  As well, Bell Nexxia will benefit from the significant research and development work and the sophisticated networks in place in Atlantic Canada.”

“Secondly, we will expand our businesses and revenues outside our borders.  We're going to create tremendous opportunities for revenue and customer growth, market reach, and satisfying careers for our people.”  AtlanticCo's expanded information technology group now includes xwave solutions, MITI Information Technology Inc., NBTel's IT practice, and Island Tel Advanced Solutions.  “We will grow our IT business by focusing on the total technology needs of clients in telecom, oil and gas, and selected public sectors worldwide.”

The mobile satellite communications business will be driven through AtlanticCo's majority ownership in Stratos Global Corporation (TSE: SGB).  Through this investment AtlanticCo will be a major player in satellite communications worldwide.  “The wider capital pool available from this merger will help finance Stratos' growth strategy, and Stratos will also pursue joint opportunities with BCE's mobile satellite business.”  “The Emerging Business portfolio will be focused on developing and nurturing new technology-based products and services in support of telecom-intensive industries.  These innovations will be integrated and delivered through our other lines of business and through export opportunities around the globe.”

“The combination of these skills and resources creates a very dynamic company that will deliver increased shareholder value.  We are confident, that, through our activities, we will make a positive contribution to the economy of Atlantic Canada and to our provincial operating regions.”

Telecommunications


AtlanticCo's telecommunications division brings together the major Atlantic provincial wireline and wireless telecommunications companies with a common operating platform to create the third largest Canadian-owned incumbent telecommunications company, under the leadership of Colin Latham.  As President of MT&T and Chairman of the Stentor Council of CEOs, Mr. Latham is a recognized leader in the telecommunications industry.

“Our companies have been cooperating on a number of strategic initiatives over the years through the Atlantic Provinces Telecommunications Council.  We have jointly developed and implemented a common world-class billing system, as well as payroll and finance and administrative systems representing investments of more than $100 million.  We will focus on gaining efficiencies, especially in our operational and capital programs, and re-invest in new areas of telecom growth, such as wireless, high speed Internet access, and sophisticated e-commerce applications,”  Mr. Latham said.  The provincial telecom units will continue as separate entities with their strong brand identities and they will maintain their consistent focus on superior customer services delivered by their employees in their own communities.  The senior telecom management will include Mr. Latham, President of MT&T; Fred Morash, President of Island Telecom; Frank Fagan, President of NewTel Communications; and Gerry Pond, President of NBTel.

“This senior telecom team will be committed to delivering superior customer service, at competitive rates, and utilizing the resources and skills of our people.  We will retain strong local presence, as the provincial telecom units will continue with their own brand identities, and their own customer service operations.  All four provinces will still be served by their local company after the merger is completed.”

Information Technology and Emerging Business


As President and CEO of Bruncor, Gerry Pond has developed the corporation into a world leader in customer service, innovation, and research and development.  Nearly one-third of Bruncor's revenues in 1998 were generated by the sale of the Company's intellectual property and consulting skills.

“I'm looking forward to growing this exciting company.  There are tremendous opportunities available to us, and we are now poised to take full advantage for the benefit of our future growth.”  “The alignment of our information technology resources creates an organization with tremendous strengths in IT consulting, IT outsourcing, systems integration, enterprise management, value-added resale and high demand specialty practice areas, and network services.  We will be adding to our 1,800 employees in our centres of expertise across the country and internationally.”  AtlanticCo IT business units are located in St. John's, Charlottetown, Halifax, Saint John, Fredericton, Moncton, Toronto, Ottawa, Calgary, Edmonton, and Dallas.

Stratos Global, with offices in St. John's, Toronto, Bethesda, London and Hong Kong, delivers multiple communications services to commercial companies worldwide in maritime, oil and gas, mining, and aeronautical sectors.  “Stratos Global successfully manages a number of key communications requirements for the U.S. Navy from its base in Atlantic Canada.  This is the kind of growth strategy that AtlanticCo will continue to concentrate on.”

“It has certainly been our experience that the people and companies of Atlantic Canada are leaders in new technology development and applications.  In New Brunswick we've seen the LivingLAB™ innovations environment produce a variety of new services, which are being utilized worldwide.

“Our export and advanced services businesses will have access to an increased capital pool and we will be focused on continuing the aggressive development of products and services for telecom-intensive industries such as computer telephony integration, TV over copper, high-speed residential and business e-commerce solutions and others,” Mr. Pond said.

Change in Industry


The combined company will gain significant efficiencies as a result of the merger, resulting in annualized savings projected at $80 million in operating expenses and $50 million in capital expenditures.  “For example, right now we have four companies each purchasing licenses to use computer software for administrative systems; that will now be reduced to one system.  Similarly, we will undertake the joint purchase of network equipment, thereby reducing expenditures”, said Mr. Wetmore.

Mr. Wetmore emphasized that AtlanticCo, in line with the general restructuring which has been taking place in the industry, will see a rebalancing of employment from some segments of our operation to the growth areas of the business.  “In NewTel's case, for example, while our employee base in the telecom business declined by 800 positions during the 1990s, NewTel's total employment actually rose from 2,200 to 3,000 employees and professionals.  “Furthermore, in undertaking this rebalancing, only 45 positions were impacted by layoffs.  That's the track record, and the values, which AtlanticCo will bring to our restructuring program.”

“Over the past year, our four companies have increased our workforce by 1,000 employees.  With our emphasis on growth and investment, we are going to continue to create jobs.  We expect total employment for AtlanticCo to grow, and, given the potential of our industry, this will have a positive impact on telecom-related and IT sectors in Atlantic Canada.”

Bruncor Inc. (TSE, ME: BRR) is a communications-focused, management holding company with investments in companies providing local and long-distance telephone services, wireless, Internet, advanced network, multimedia and information technology services.  Its operations include: NBTel, NBTel Mobility, MITI Information Technology Inc. (MITI), ImagicTV Inc., New North Media, NBTel Global Inc., and Connectivity Managed Network Services Ltd.

Island Telecom Inc. is a Prince Edward Island company which uses its world-class digital telecommunications network and a team of more than 300 dedicated employees to deliver advanced technology, products and services to the residents of Canada's smallest province.  Island Telecom's operating subsidiary is Island Tel Advanced Solutions Inc. (ITAS).

Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited is Nova Scotia's largest telecommunications provider.  It brings its customers the power of information age through innovative telecommunications consulting and technology solutions and services, including wireline and wireless voice, data and Internet access.  MT&T's holdings include Maritime Tel & Tel Limited, MT&T Mobility Inc., MT&T Leasing Inc. and MT&T Holdings Inc.

NewTel Enterprises Limited (TSE: NEL) of Newfoundland is a group of technology companies, with 3,000 professionals serving customers in worldwide markets in telecommunications, information technology and mobile satellite services.  The NewTel Group includes NewTel Communications, NewTel Mobility, xwave solutions, Stratos Global Corporation, AMI Offshore, and NewTech Instruments.

More information on the four companies may be found on their websites: www.newtel.com www.bruncor.com www.islandtel.pe.ca www.mtt.ca





Merger of Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company, Limited, Bruncor Inc., NewTel Enterprises Limited and Island Telecom Inc.



Summary of Combined Company
Note: All figures are in Canadian dollars and are
as at and for the year ended December 31, 1998.


Operations

Total Employees 8,610
Network Access Services 1,620
Long Distance Minutes 2,152,200
Mobility Subscribers 230,600
Internet Subscribers 126,900
Long Distance Market Share 86%
Mobility Market Share 78%
Internet Market Share 71%





Merger of Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company, Limited, Bruncor Inc., NewTel Enterprises Limited and Island Telecom Inc.



Transaction Summary


Interim Company Name

  3595641 Canada Inc. (“AtlanticCo”)


Transaction Structure

  Amalgamations (Bruncor, NewTel, Island Tel)
  Plan of Arrangement (MT&T)


Exchange Ratio

  1.667 AtlanticCo common shares per MT&T common share
  1.011 AtlanticCo common shares per Bruncor common share
  1.567 AtlanticCo common shares per NewTel common share
  1.000 AtlanticCo common shares per Island Tel common share
  0.605 AtlanticCo common shares per MT&T preferred share


Share Structure

  Common voting (1 share = 1 vote)


Accounting Treatment

  Pooling of interests


Tax Treatment

  Tax free rollover for shareholders


Proposed Dividend Policy

  $0.90 per AtlanticCo common share


Designated Chairman

  Lino J. Celeste


Designated President & CEO

  Stephen G. Wetmore


Designated CFO

  Robert H. Benson


Designated Executive Team

  Gerald L. Pond, Executive Vice President and President Information Technology and Emerging Business
  Colin Latham, Executive Vice President and President Telecommunications
  William H. Steeves, Vice President Corporate Services


BCE Inc. Ownership

  Approximately 41.6%


Board of Directors

  13 members, comprised of 3 each from MT&T, Bruncor and NewTel; 1 from Island Tel; 2 from BCE Inc.; and the President and CEO of AtlanticCo


Strategic Alliance

  Agreement between BCE Inc. and Bell Canada


Approvals Required

  MT&T – 50% by number, and 75% by value of votes cast
  Bruncor – 66 2/3% of votes cast
  NewTel – 66 2/3% of votes cast
  Island Tel – 75% of votes cast


Cost Savings Estimates

  $80 million annually in cash operating costs by the end of year 2
  $50 million annually in capital by the end of year 2


Expected Transaction Timing

  Mailing of Information Circular:  Mid April 1999
  Shareholders Meetings:  May 18 and 19, 1999
  Closing:  May 31, 1999




Source: (BellAliant archive)
AtlanticCo press release, 22 March 1999
http://bellaliant.ca/english/news/news2.asp?YYYY=1999&currentPage=7&Keyword=&BU1=&BU2=&BU3=&BU4=&BU5=&BU6=&BU7=&BU8=&FromDay=1&FromMonth=1&FromYear=1999&ToDay=31&ToMonth=12&ToYear=1999&frompage=news&id=17





1999 May 19

Merger Approved by Shareholders


MT&T to be merged with
Three Other Phone Companies
to form AtlanticCo


Atlantic merger will launch $3B Company


Merger of
Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Ltd., Bruncor Inc., NewTel Enterprises Ltd. and Island Telecom Inc.


Wednesday, May 19, 1999
Atlantic merger approved, creating new $3B growth company

ST. JOHN'S, HALIFAX, CHARLOTTETOWN, SAINT JOHN, May 19 /CNW/ – Bruncor Inc., Island Telecom Inc., Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company, Limited, and NewTel Enterprises Limited, owners of the major IT and provincial telecommunications companies in Atlantic Canada, announced today that shareholders at their respective annual and special general meetings approved the merger of their four entities.  Over 99% of shareholders voted in favour of the resolution to form one company with the working name of AtlanticCo.

Speaking on behalf of the chairpersons of each company, Bruncor's chairman, Lino Celeste, said; “Merger approval by such a high number of shareholders clearly demonstrates that the creation of a new holding company makes sound business sense.  This is an historic moment for our companies and for all of Atlantic Canada.  We're very pleased that shareholders supported the findings of our recommendations.”

The merger will create a new entity, structured as a holding company, owning 100 per cent of each of the four regional telecommunications companies, as well as the current ownership positions of the other, non-telecommunications businesses of Bruncor, NewTel and MTT.  It will operate with a virtual head office; all of the current offices in Atlantic Canada will continue to play an important role.

“By uniting, we will capitalize on our strengths and become the largest publicly traded company in Atlantic Canada,” said Stephen Wetmore, president and CEO of AtlanticCo.  “But it's not our size and our growth prospects that matter most; it's the fact that we'll be forming a company that can safeguard our futures.

“Our new company has a solid financial foundation, the size, scope and growth strategies to become a significant player in North America's communications and information technology industries,” Mr. Wetmore said.  “It will deliver superior services to our customers; it will provide satisfying careers for our employees; it will offer rewards for shareholders; and it will be a positive force supporting Atlantic Canada's economy.”

The merged company, at an initial market capitalization of $3 billion, will be one of the largest private-sector employers in Atlantic Canada with 9,000 employees.  AtlanticCo will be the third-largest incumbent telecommunications company in Canada, the second-largest Canadian-owned IT group, and one of the largest mobile satellite services companies in North America.

The new company will be launched as a growth company with four core lines of business: telecommunications, information technology (IT), mobile satellite communications, and emerging business.

The senior management team of AtlanticCo will include: Stephen Wetmore, President and CEO of NewTel Enterprises who becomes President and CEO of AtlanticCo; Colin Latham, President and CEO of MTT, who becomes Executive Vice-President, AtlanticCo, and President, AtlanticCo Telecommunications, overseeing the operations of the four telecommunications companies – NBTel, MTT, Island Tel, and NewTel Communications; Gerry Pond, President and CEO of Bruncor and NBTel, who becomes Executive Vice-President, AtlanticCo, and President of Information Technology and Emerging Business, AtlanticCo; Bob Benson, Executive Vice-President and CFO, NewTel, who becomes Executive Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer, AtlanticCo; Bill Steeves, Vice-President and CFO, Bruncor and NBTel, who becomes Vice-President, Corporate Services, AtlanticCo, heading up a transition team to manage the organizational integration.  Fred Morash, President of Island Tel and Frank Fagan, President of NewTel Communications will continue in their respective leadership positions.  Gerry Pond and Colin Latham will remain in their positions as president and CEO of NBTel and MTT, respectively.  Lino Celeste, Chairman of Bruncor, will become the non-executive chairman of AtlanticCo.

To approve the merger, 66 2/3 per cent of votes cast had to be in favour of the special resolution at Bruncor and NewTel EnterprisesIsland Telecom's shareholders needed to approve the resolution with 75 per cent of all votes cast and MTT's shareholders had to agree with 50 per cent by number and 75 per cent by value of votes cast.

The formal launch of AtlanticCo - with a new name - will take place by early June.  Over the course of the next two weeks, all four companies will concentrate on completing legal and stock exchange requirements.

AtlanticCo is the current working name of the management holding company.  Its operations will provide advanced communications services and integrated solutions to customers worldwide.  With 9,000 employees throughout Canada and the US, it will deliver expertise in the areas of local, long-distance, wireless, data, Internet, information technology, managed network services, and mobile satellite communications.  Its customers include public and private enterprises, governments, businesses and consumers. AtlanticCo's structure will include four lines of business.

Telecommunications

NBTel, MTT, Island Tel, NewTel Communications, NBTel Mobility, MTT Mobility, Island Tel Mobility, NewTel Mobility.


Information technology

MITI Information Technology Inc., (MITI), xwave solutions, Island Tel Advanced Solutions (ITAS), NBTel's IT division.


Mobile satellite services

Stratos Global Corporation


Emerging business

AMI Offshore, Salter New Media, Brooklyn North, ConneCTIvity, iMagicTV, NBTel Global, New North Media, NewTech Instruments, MTT Holdings Inc., and MTT Leasing Inc.


AtlanticCo shares will trade on the TSE.



Source: (BellAliant archive)
AtlanticCo press release, 19 May 1999
http://bellaliant.ca/english/news/news2.asp?YYYY=1999&currentPage=7&Keyword=&BU1=&BU2=&BU3=&BU4=&BU5=&BU6=&BU7=&BU8=&FromDay=1&FromMonth=1&FromYear=1999&ToDay=31&ToMonth=12&ToYear=1999&frompage=news&id=18


Source: (BellAliant archive)
AtlanticCo press release, 22 May 1999
http://bellaliant.ca/english/news/news2.asp?YYYY=1999&currentPage=7&Keyword=&BU1=&BU2=&BU3=&BU4=&BU5=&BU6=&BU7=&BU8=&FromDay=1&FromMonth=1&FromYear=1999&ToDay=31&ToMonth=12&ToYear=1999&frompage=news&id=17





1999 May 31

Last Business Day for MT&T


This day, Monday, 31 May 1999, was the last business day for the venerable Maritime Telegraph & Telephone Company, the dominant telephone company in Nova Scotia since 1910.





1999 June 1

Merger Completed


A new name appears on the TSE


MT&T has been merged with
Three Other Phone Companies
to form AtlanticCo Aliant


Aliant launched; enters TSE
as $3B growth company


Merger of
Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Ltd., Bruncor Inc., NewTel Enterprises Ltd. and Island Telecom Inc.


May 31, 1999
Atlantic merger approved, creating new $3B growth company

ST. JOHN'S, HALIFAX, CHARLOTTETOWN, SAINT JOHN, May 31 – A new name will enter the TSE tomorrow with the launch of Aliant Inc., a $3 billion growth company with annual revenues of $1.7 billion, 9,000 employees, and interests in telecommunications, information technology, mobile satellite communications, and emerging business.

Trading under the symbol "AIT", Aliant has emerged onto the Canadian technology scene from the business combination of Bruncor Inc., Island Telecom Inc., Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited, and NewTel Enterprises Limited, owners of the major IT and provincial telecommunications companies in Atlantic Canada.  Over 99% of voting shareholders were in favour of the resolution to form one company in Shareholder Meetings which were held on May 18 and 19.  BCE Inc. will beneficially own* 41.6% of Aliant.  As a result of this combination, the shares of Bruncor (BRR), Island Tel (IT), MTT (MTT), and NewTel Enterprises (NEL) will no longer be traded on the stock exchanges as of the opening of business tomorrow...

* “Beneficial owner” is a legal term where specific property rights in equity belong to a person (or corporation) even though legal title of the property belongs to another person (or corporation).  The “beneficial owner” is the true owner of a security.  An investor may have securities registered in the name of a broker, trustee or bank to facilitate transfer or to preserve anonymity, but the investor is the beneficial owner and will receive any dividends, interest or profits from sales.  Under SEC rules, a beneficial owner is someone who has either voting power or investment power over a security.  Voting power is defined as the power to vote or direct the voting of a security.  Investment power is defined as the power to dispose or direct the disposal of a security.




The Wayback Machine has archived copies
of this news release:
Aliant launched
Release date: May 31, 1999

Archived: 2000 Feb 26    Launch of Aliant Inc.
http://web.archive.org/web/20000226224054/http://www.islandtel.pe.ca/
    aboutislandtel/Island_Tel_News/Aliant_launch.htm

Archived: 2000 Aug 23    Launch of Aliant Inc.
http://web.archive.org/web/20000823114955/www.islandtel.pe.ca/
    aboutislandtel/Island_Tel_News/Aliant_launch.htm



Origin of the "Aliant" name?






The Wayback Machine has archived copies of this website:
Bruncor Inc.
The New Brunswick Telephone Company Limited
Saint John, New Brunswick

Archived: 1996 Oct 19    Bruncor Inc. Home Page
http://web.archive.org/web/19961019084436/www.bruncor.com/

Archived: 1996 Oct 19    Bruncor Inc. – What We Do
http://web.archive.org/web/19961019084618/www.bruncor.com/brun95/htm-e/glance.htm

Archived: 1996 Oct 19    Bruncor Inc. Directors 1995
http://web.archive.org/web/19961019084601/www.bruncor.com/brun95/htm-e/director.htm

Archived: 1996 Oct 19    Bruncor Inc. year-end report 1995
http://web.archive.org/web/19961019084515/www.bruncor.com/95yrend/e-yr_end.htm

Archived: 1998 Dec 05    Frank McKenna appointed a Bruncor director
http://web.archive.org/web/19981205163052/www.bruncor.com/whats-new/whats-new.htm

Archived: 1998 Apr 24    Bruncor buys MITI
http://web.archive.org/web/19980424231057/www.bruncor.com/whats-new/whats-new.htm




The Wayback Machine has archived copies of this website:
Maritime Telegraph & Telephone Company
Halifax, Nova Scotia

Archived: 1996 Nov 11    Home page
http://web.archive.org/web/19961111153921/www.mtt.ca/index.html

Note: There is a big gaffe at the top of this Home Page:
They got the company's name wrong:
Maritime Telephone and Telegraph Company Limited
(“Telegraph” after “Telephone”)

Archived: 1996 Nov 11    Colin Latham speech to shareholders
http://web.archive.org/web/19961111154456/www.mtt.ca/sharehol.html

Note: Here they got the company's name stated correctly:
Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited
(“Telegraph” before “Telephone”)

Archived: 1997 Jan 25    Home page
http://web.archive.org/web/19970125131858/http://www.mtt.ca/

Note: Here they are unable to decide what the company's name is:
Two different versions appear on this one page,
with “Telegraph” before and after “Telephone”

Archived: 1996 Nov 11    MT&T reports results for 1995
http://web.archive.org/web/19961111153629/http://www.mtt.ca/1995yend.html

Archived: 1996 Nov 11    MT&T reports results for first quarter 1996
http://web.archive.org/web/19961111153637/http://www.mtt.ca/1st1996.html

Archived: 1996 Nov 11    MT&T reports results for third quarter 1996
http://web.archive.org/web/19961111153957/www.mtt.ca/mtt3q.html

Archived: 1996 Nov 11    Comments re MT&T results for third quarter 1996
http://web.archive.org/web/19961111153652/http://www.mtt.ca/3qanalys.html




The Wayback Machine has archived copies of this website:
Island Telephone Company Limited
Island Telecom Inc.
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Archived: 1997 May 31    Island Telephone Company Limited
http://web.archive.org/web/19970531215722/http://www.islandtel.pe.ca/

Archived: 1998 Jan 19    Island Telephone Company Limited
http://web.archive.org/web/19980119212547/http://www.islandtel.pe.ca/

Archived: 1998 Jan 19    Welcome to Call Minder
http://web.archive.org/web/19980119212601/www.islandtel.pe.ca/
    callminder/index.html

Archived: 1998 Jan 19    Island Tel's Top Free Stuff
http://web.archive.org/web/19980119212939/www.islandtel.pe.ca/
    news/topten.html

Archived: 1998 Jan 19    Online services now available
http://web.archive.org/web/19980119213018/www.islandtel.pe.ca/
    index.html

Archived: 1998 Jan 19    Digital switching conversion completed
http://web.archive.org/web/19980119213617/www.islandtel.pe.ca/
    news/switchover.html

Archived: 1998 Jan 19    Letter to shareholders
http://web.archive.org/web/19980119214058/www.islandtel.pe.ca/
    annual_report/letter.html

Archived: 1998 Dec 06    Island Tel Advanced Solutions
http://web.archive.org/web/19981206040503/www.itas.net/company.html

Archived: 2000 Feb 29    About Island Tel
http://web.archive.org/web/20000229112621/http://www.islandtel.pe.ca/
   aboutislandtel/about_itel.htm

Archived: 2000 Aug 23    Island Tel Advanced Solutions
http://web.archive.org/web/20000823114938/www.islandtel.pe.ca/
    aboutislandtel/Island_Tel_News/new_jobs.htm




The Wayback Machine has archived copies of this website:
NewTel Enterprises Ltd.
St. John's, Newfoundland

Archived: 1998 Dec 12    NewTel Enterprises
http://web.archive.org/web/19981212031356/http://www.newtel.com/

Archived: 1999 Mar 02    NewTel Enterprises
http://web.archive.org/web/19990302025150/http://www.newtel.com/

Archived: 1998 Dec 12    NewTech Instruments
http://web.archive.org/web/19981212031357/www.newtech.newtel.com/profile.htm

Archived: 1998 Dec 12    Stratos Global Corporation
http://web.archive.org/web/19981212033104/www.stratos.ca/





1999 November 6

Aliant Board Approves Amalgamation


CHARLOTTETOWN, PEI, Nov. 6, 2000 — Aliant Telecom Inc.'s Board of Directors has approved an amalgamation with certain of its wholly owned subsidiaries including NBTel Inc., NewTel Communications Inc., Island Telecom Inc. and Maritime Tel & Tel Ltd. pursuant to provisions of the Canada Business Corporations Act.  The reorganization will be completed on January 1, 2001, subject to the approval of certain bondholders for some of the individual subsidiaries.  Meetings with bondholders will be held in Toronto in December.

The rationale for the proposed amalgamation is to align the legal structures of the telecom business of Aliant to reflect the actual operational practices, which have existed since the merger of the parent companies in June of 1999.  If approved, this amalgamation will streamline accounting, financial and cash management processes as well as tax, legal and regulatory filings.

Provided bondholders approve, this amalgamation will mean these subsidiaries will legally begin to operate under the Aliant Telecom name.  Aliant Telecom will continue to use existing brand names — MTT, NB Tel, Island Tel and NewTel — in their respective provincial markets.

Source:
Aliant Inc. press release, 6 November 2000
    http://www.newswire.ca/releases/November2000/06/c1793.html
    http://biz.yahoo.com/cnw/001106/aliant_sub.html




1999 November 24

MT&T Incorporation Act Amended

Bill 24
An Act to Amend Chapter 156 of the Acts of 1910,
an Act to Incorporate
the Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company, Limited

On this day, Royal Assent was given to the following Act of the Nova Scotia Legislature:
1   Clause 14A(1)(a) of Chapter 156 of the Acts of 1910, An Act to Incorporate the Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited, as enacted by Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1990, is repealed.
[That's the entire text.]

Source: Bill No. 24 – An Act to Amend Chapter 156 of the Acts of 1910, An Act to Incorporate the Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited
    http://nslegislature.ca/legc/bills/58th_1st/3rd_read/b024.htm




Nova Scotia Legislature
Second Reading of Bill 24
An Act to Amend Chapter 156 of the Acts of 1910...

16 November 1999

Source: Nova Scotia Hansard, 16 November 1999, page 2144
    http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/C52/58_1_h99nov16/i99nov16.htm#[Page%202144]

Mr. Timothy Olive, (Dartmouth South):
    Mr. Speaker, I would like to move second reading of An Act to Amend Chapter 156 of the Acts of 1910, an Act to Incorporate the Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company, Limited.

Mr. Speaker:
    The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.

Mr. Robert Chisholm:
    Mr. Speaker, I was just wondering if the member who is sponsoring this bill would take a few moments and explain to members of this House the reason behind the introduction of this bill.  I would certainly appreciate it.  I have a little bit of

[Page 2145]

information, but I think there are other people here who would like to learn more about this bill, and the member for Dartmouth South could help us.  I say this intervention in the form of a question.  I wonder would the member for Dartmouth South mind getting to his feet to answer that question.

Mr. Speaker:
    The honourable member for Dartmouth South.

Mr. Timothy Olive:
    I would be very pleased to, Mr. Speaker.  I thank the member for the question and for the comment.  Yes, I did do a little research on this because I anticipated that I might be asked the question.  As you may be well aware, the Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company, way back in 1910, passed a private Act to incorporate the company.  Subsequent to that and in recent time, as a matter of fact, you are probably also aware that the Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company has amalgamated with three other major organizations in Atlantic Canada.  The actual Clause 14A(1)(a) of Chapter 156, makes reference to the fact that the company is directly or indirectly controlled by Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited and that clause is, in fact, being eliminated because it is no longer controlled by Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited.  I hope that clarifies the matter for the honourable member. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker:
    The honourable member for Richmond.

Mr. Michel Samson:
    Mr. Speaker, certainly I appreciate the question put forward by the Leader of the New Democratic Party because as I was preparing to rise to my feet it was to put the same question forward to the member for Dartmouth South.  It is a relatively small piece of legislation, but certainly I don't think we had a bill briefing for this one either, nor did we have any sort of information, nor did we have any indication from that member of the actual purpose behind this bill.
    Certainly, I would recommend that in the future the member give some indication to this House of the reasoning behind this very bill. Hearing his explanation, I was not aware that MTT had actually gone under a private Act in 1910 to incorporate the company.  Knowing where MTT, I believe now is the proper way to refer to them most recently, have been a leader in innovation in the telecommunications industry here in this province.  We are aware that they have amalgamated with other companies to provide better service to Nova Scotians. They have gone a long way in the service that has been provided.
    For my own part, and I am pretty confident I speak on behalf of my caucus, we do not have any immediate objection to this bill, maybe in the Committee on Private and Local Bills something will come up.  Someone may call with some serious concerns that we are not aware of at this point in time.  As a good Opposition Party, we are always ready to hear any concerns

[Page 2146]

that Nova Scotians might have on this one clause bill that the member for Dartmouth South has brought forward.  Having heard his explanation, this Liberal caucus here in the House would not want to be seen to be standing in the way of MTT moving ahead in its innovation and its service to the good people of Nova Scotia, whom we have all been elected to serve.
    Mr. Speaker, in closing, we do support moving Bill No. 24 to second reading, and again to the Law Amendments Committee where we may have numerous amendments to make to this bill.  One can only tell with time.  Certainly at this point in time, we will not hold up this bill any further, and see it make its way through the House. Thank you. (Applause)



2001 January 1

Maritime Telegraph & Telephone Company
Goes Out of Business

After 90 Years as Nova Scotia's Biggest Telephone Company


Aliant Bondholders Approve Amalgamation of Subsidiaries


CHARLOTTETOWN, PEI, Dec. 22, 2000 — At meetings held in Toronto on December 15, 2000, the bondholders of NewTel Communications Inc., Island Telecom Inc. and Maritime Tel & Tel Ltd. approved changes to their trust indentures which will allow for the amalgamation of Aliant Telecom Inc. with certain of its wholly owned subsidiaries including those three companies and NBTel Inc.

Amalgamation Effective 1 January 2001


Under the amalgamation, these subsidiaries will legally begin to operate under the Aliant Telecom name.  Aliant Telecom will continue to use existing brand names — MTT, NB Tel, Island Tel and NewTel in their respective provincial markets.  The reorganization will be completed on January 1, 2001.

The rationale for the amalgamation is to align the legal structures of the telecom business of Aliant to reflect the actual operational practices, which have developed since the merger of the parent companies in June of 1999.  Approval from the bondholders means Aliant can now proceed with the amalgamation which will streamline accounting, financial and cash management processes as well as tax, legal and regulatory filings.

Dominion Bond Rating Service has confirmed that Aliant Telecom will now have an "A" rating on all of its secured and unsecured debt.  The recently merged Standard & Poor's and Canadian Bond Rating Service have confirmed that Aliant Telecom will now have an "A" rating on its unsecured debt.  The secured debt of the former Maritime Tel & Tel Ltd. will be rated "AA-"; and the secured debt of the former NewTel Communications Inc. and Island Telecom Inc. will be rated "A+".

Source:
Aliant Inc. press release, 22 December 2000
    http://www.newswire.ca/releases/December2000/22/c6027.html
    http://biz.yahoo.com/cnw/001222/aliant_ama.html




2002 April 22

Happy 92nd Birthday to
the employees and shareholders of MTT

Nova Scotia Legislature
Resolution No. 3287

From Page 8597, Hansard's report of proceedings
in the Nova Scotia Legislature
on 22 April 2002:


MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas it was on this date, April 22, 1910, that the Maritime Telegraph & Telephone Company became incorporated; and

Whereas today, 92 years later, MTT, now part of Aliant Inc., employs more than 2,600 people and is the second largest employer in the Province of Nova Scotia; and

Whereas MTT provides services to more than 5,500 corporate business and residential customers across Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that all MLAs extend an exceptionally Happy 92nd Birthday to the employees and shareholders of MTT and wish them another 92 years of success as they continue to provide leading-edge telecommunication services to Nova Scotians.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Source: Nova Scotia Hansard, 22 April 2002, page 8597
    http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/C53/house_02apr22/#H[Page%208597]



2003 April 10

Amendment of the Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited Act

Nova Scotia Legislature

Subcommittee of the Whole House on Supply

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Chairman, through you, I thank the minister for that point because it leads me up to the next point I would like to make, and that's with regard to concerns that were raised over the last year with the Enron scandal.  There were some suggestions through media reports and the like that the paper trail landed back here in part to Nova Scotia.  Is the minister aware of any such action, and what was the impact on Nova Scotia business and, indeed, the Department of Economic Development, the bottom line for the province?

[Page 156]

MR. CLARKE: Mr. Chairman, just with that particular inquiry, obviously just with all of that, with the legislation as it applies to companies, there was an instance where because of the way the Companies Act – and I will get the detail for you, member, on that, but you do refer to a point that was picked up, but as far as negative impact, financially or otherwise to the province, it is my understanding that there isn't.

MR. MACKINNON: There is no impact?

MR. CLARKE: No.  I will clarify that.

MR. MACKINNON: I noticed in the latter part of 1999, I think it was October, the present Administration amended the Maritime Telegraph and Telephone Company Limited Act.  In effect, what it did, as best as I can ascertain, is that it allowed the protection of having a head office in Nova Scotia to another jurisdiction.  I'm not sure if the minister is aware of that or not.  When that Act was firmed up – well, it goes back to 1910 – under the Stanfield Administration, he was very keen to ensure that Nova Scotia interests were protected.  That was a factor.  But that was, for whatever reason, removed when it became a partner in Aliant.  I've noticed, as a result of that, and I may be wrong, there was a loss of jobs in Nova Scotia.  Would the minister be aware of any of that situation, and would he be prepared to comment on that?

MR. CLARKE: Mr. Chairman, just with that, in speaking on the Aliant merger of companies, there are a couple of things within the industry sector itself, in telecommunications, one is obviously a consolidation and the competitive nature and the need to be on top of both the provision of the service but also the technology, obviously meeting the demands of the board of directors and the shareholding interests.  With specifics to Aliant's job allocations, it is my understanding, member, that when there was a merger of interests that some of the position and personnel allocations were adjusted, but again, with that, given the nature of Aliant, I will note it for acquiring a follow-up for you...



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