Seaboard Power Corporation Ltd.





The Seaboard generating station was located in Glace Bay.  It was closed (ceased generating power) in 1997.

Located on the west side of Big Glace Bay Lake

GPS location:   46°10'20"N   59°56'55"W
Google map




Seaboard Power Plant by Glen Smith
http://web.archive.org/web/20070327110746/http://home.ca.inter.net/
~gsmith2/DOSCO/Seaboard/Seaboard.htm




On 1st January 1966, all of the outstanding shares of Seaboard Power Corporation Limited were purchased by the Nova Scotia Power Commission from from the Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation Limited.
— Nova Scotia Power Commission Annual Report 1966, page 8



1965
Nova Scotia Power Commission annual report 1965 page 11
Seaboard generating station: Two new high-pressure boilers installed in 1965
and a new high-voltage power line to connect to the mainland grid.
Nova Scotia Power Commission annual report 1965, page 11

The topping turbine extension to the Seaboard Power generating plant at Glace Bay will provide process steam for the nearby Deuterium of Canada Limited heavy water plant, and in addition will produce a substantial quantity of electric power to supply growth of electrical load on Cape Breton Island and, through the new high-voltage power line connection between Victoria Junction and Port Hastings, everywhere in Nova Scotia.
— Nova Scotia Power Commission Annual Report 1965, page 3




Seaboard Power first synchronized with mainland grid, 1966 Feb 02
Photograph taken in the Seaboard Power generating plant at Glace Bay,
1:20am, 8 February 1966, on the occasion when the Seaboard generating plant
was first synchronized with (connected to) the mainland power grid.
L to R:  Ivan Smith, M. McNeil, H. Hynes
They are grouped around the remote-control panel that operates the
high-voltage circuit breakers at the Victoria Junction switchyard,
13 km away, by a high-frequency power-line carrier-current signal.

Photograph by Norman Gentile

Saved from discard in 1985 by Reg Mollon



Seaboard Power first synchronized with mainland grid, 1966 Feb 02
Photograph taken in the Seaboard Power generating plant at Glace Bay,
1:20am, 8 February 1966, on the occasion when the Seaboard generating plant
was first synchronized with (connected to) the mainland power grid.
L to R:  D. Matheson, Bill MacDonald
in the Control Room at the Seaboard generating plant.

Photograph by Norman Gentile

Saved from discard in 1985 by Reg Mollon



Seaboard Power first synchronized with mainland grid, 1966 Feb 02
Photograph taken in the Seaboard Power generating plant at Glace Bay,
1:20am, 8 February 1966, on the occasion when the Seaboard generating plant
was first synchronized with (connected to) the mainland power grid.
L to R:  D. Matheson, Ivan Smith, Bill MacDonald
They are grouped around the remote-control panel that operates the
high-voltage circuit breakers at the Victoria Junction switchyard,
13 km away, by a high-frequency power-line carrier-current signal.

Photograph by Norman Gentile

Saved from discard in 1985 by Reg Mollon



Nova Scotia Power Commission annual report 1965 page 12
New (1965) high-voltage switchyard at Victoria Junction to connect
the Seaboard generating station to the mainland grid.
Nova Scotia Power Commission annual report 1965, page 12



1966
Nova Scotia Power Commission annual report 1966 page 19
Connecting the Seaboard generating plant to the Grid made
possible a far greater energy output from that source, permitting
in turn a corresponding reduction in putchased energy in 1966.
Nova Scotia Power Commission annual report 1966, page 19



1966
Seaboard Power Corporation, money flow Jan-Nov 1966
Seaboard Power Corporation: Revenue and Expenditure, Jan-Nov 1966
Nova Scotia Power Commission annual report 1966, page 18



Operating report form
Seaboard Power Station, 23kV transmission line report form
Seaboard Power Station, 23kV transmission line report form
"Amperes 1. 2. 3." reports the electric current in amperes in each
individual phase (wire conductor) of the three-phase power line.

Example: If the 23kV line loading (power sent out) was 5MW at 90% power factor,
then the current would be about 140 amperes in each phase (assuming a balanced loading).

"P. F." means power factor






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First uploaded to the WWW:   2008 July 27
Latest update:   2012 September 14