Significant Dates in
Nova Scotia Railway History

(1900 - 1949)




1900 March 30
Cape Breton Electric Tramway & Power Company

The Cape Breton Electric Tramway & Power Company was incorporated on this day. It operated a local street railway service in Sydney, and a separate (not physically connected) 6 mile 10 km line from North Sydney to Sydney Mines. CBET&P Co. also operated a ferry service between Sydney and North Sydney. For most of its existence the company was a direct subsidiary of the Stone & Webster traction empire. The company's name was later changed to Cape Breton Electric Company.




1901 December 11
North Sydney Should be on Alert; Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Works May Go to Sydney Mines. North Sydney's Concessions Not Sufficient, No Free Site Having Been Offered by the Town

Special despatch to The Herald

Sydney Mines, December 11 – The Herald's correspondent is in a position to say tonight that the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company may possibly establish their steel works at Sydney Mines in conjunction with the coke plant, the concessions offered by North Sydney not being as favourable as expected. The company was expecting a free site for their works. The town council here are ready to exempt the company from taxation for a long term of years, and as the company own the property here a site would not cost them anything. Should Sydney Mines be selected no doubt the plant will be erected near the Princess pit.
[The Halifax Herald, 12 December 1901, page 1]




1901 December 12
I&RR Main Line Connected to ICR Main Line; Lines of Steel Now Are Joined

The first through car from Broad Cove (now named Inverness), Inverness County, went out over the Inverness and Richmond Railway today, this being McKenzie and Mann's private car Atikokan. In the morning it was shunted from Point Tupper to Point Tupper Junction, where the car was attached to a special engine of the Inverness and Richmond Railway and run to Broad Cove. On board this car were Messrs. William McKenzie and Donald Mann; Mr. Sinclair, the general manager of the road; Charles Fergie, of Westville, Pictou County; Mr. Wallace, a Toronto capitalist; and Mr. Bristol, solicitor for the company. Heretofore the cars going over this road were transferred between Mulgrave and Hastings by ferry. Now they will be taken across from Mulgrave to Point Tupper on the ferry service which carries the ICR main line traffic. Completion of the track between Hastings and Tupper gives the through train service from Sydney to Broad Cove. The ferry service between Hastings and Mulgrave will be discontinued permanently. The object of the present visit of Messrs. McKenzie and Mann is to examine the progress of the work at Broad Cove. Mr. McKenzie feels confident that with the introduction of improved methods of mining and shipping facilities which they propose introducing they will be prepared for an output of a quarter of a million tons by the close of next season.
[The Halifax Herald, 13 December 1901, page 1]

[Note: In 1901, Point Tupper Junction, about 1km east of Point Tupper, was the junction of the Inverness & Richmond Railway's main line with the ICR main line between Sydney and Truro. Now, in 1997, this same railway junction still exists, and is the location of a small yard beside the main line of the Cape Breton & Central Nova Scotia Railway. Rail cars coming from Truro to the Stora mill at Point Tupper are dropped off the daily CB&CNSR Truro - Sydney freight train at this yard, and are then taken by a switch engine to the Stora mill. Cars from the Stora mill, destined for Truro and beyond, are brought to this yard, to be picked up by the Sydney-Truro freight train.]




1901 December 29
Dartmouth Locomotive Shed Burns

The engine house of the Intercolonial Railway in Dartmouth was destroyed by fire about midnight, 29-30 December. The high wind made it look dangerous for other buildings for a time, but fortunately it did not spread. One locomotive was in the place, which was considerably damaged. The building was erected some two years ago.
[The Halifax Herald, 30 December 1901]




1902
Mackenzie, Mann & Company

Mackenzie & Mann had been doing business for several years as a private partnership, but as time went by there was increasing pressure to alter the legal structure of the organization. Mackenzie, Mann & Company Limited was incorporated as a joint stock company in 1902, to engage in the business of railway contracting and financing. There were three shareholders: Donald Mann held 50% of the shares, William Mackenzie 45%, and his son Roderick 5%. There were five directors: the three shareholders together with Zebulon A. Lash and David Blythe Hanna. Most of the business transactions of Mackenzie, Mann & Company dealt with railways elsewhere, but this firm was the owner, and the driving force behind, the Halifax & South Western Railway Company, which built and operated 404 miles 650 km of railway in southwestern Nova Scotia.




1902 January 1
DAR Ferry Services on Bay of Fundy

Beginning on Wednesday, 1 January 1902, there was a seasonal change in the ferry services operated across the Bay of Fundy by the Dominion Atlantic Railway. From this day, S.S. Prince Rupert performed a tri-weekly ferry service across the Bay of Fundy, leaving St. John for Digby at 7:00am on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays; returning, leaving Digby at 1:00pm on the same days. On the same day, the S.S. Evangeline, running between Kingsport and Parrsboro, was withdrawn for the remainder of the winter.
["S.S." means steam ship.]
[The Halifax Herald, 30 December 1901]




1902 January 2
Streetcar Company Profitable, Pays Dividend

On 18 December 1901, the Halifax Electric Tramway Company Limited declared that "Quarterly Dividend No. 20, at the rate of 5 per cent per annum on the Capital Stock of this Company", will be paid to each stockholder on 2 January 1902.
[From a paid notice on page 10, The Halifax Herald, 20 December 1901.]




1902 March 27
Egerton Tramway Company; A New Electric Streetcar Company

On this day, the Legislature passed an Act (chapter 137, 1902, 2 Edward VII) to incorporate the Egerton Tramway Company Limited, head office in New Glasgow, with capital of $500,000 divided among 5,000 shares of $100 each, to construct, acquire, own, operate, and maintain "an electric tramway, or railway, in New Glasgow, Stellarton, Westville, Trenton, Ferrona, and Thorburn, in the county of Pictou" and between any two or more of these places; and to operate a public electric utility for "manufacturing, distributing or supplying electricity for lighting, heating, power and other purposes". The founding shareholders were William P. McNeil and G.A. Grant of New Glasgow, and Charles Fergie of Westville. While running along streets and highways the Company's streetcars had the right of way over all other traffic – "The cars shall have a right to the tracks as against any persons, carriage, or vehicle ... put, driven, or being thereon." At that time in Nova Scotia, the rule of the road was to drive on the left hand side – "All switches and turnouts shall be arranged so that cars shall pass on the left" and passengers were to be allowed to enter and leave the streetcars only "on the left side".




1902 July 1
Halifax & South Western Railway Company Buys the Nova Scotia Central Railway

On this day, the Nova Scotia Central Railway, which owned and operated the railway from Middleton through Springfield, New Germany, Bridgewater, and Mahone Bay, to Lunenburg, was bought by the Halifax & South Western Railway for $525,000. The Mahone Bay to Bridgewater section of the NSCR main line became a link in the Halifax to Yarmouth main line of the H&SWR.




1902 October
Sydney and Glace Bay Railway Company

The Sydney and Glace Bay Railway Company was a joint ownership venture of the Cape Breton Electric Company and the Dominion Coal Company. The S&GBR operated from Sydney via Reserve Junction and Dominion to Glace Bay. Beginning on 7 January 1908 it operated local streetcar service in Glace Bay which continued under successive operators until 1938. The S&GBR Co. merged with Cape Breton Electric in 1911, Dominion Coal taking CBE stock in exchange for its share of the S&GBR.

[Source: All Time List of Canadian Transit Systems (Nova Scotia section) by David A. Wyatt]




1903 April 11
Halifax & South Western Railway Company Buys the Nova Scotia Southern Railway

On this day, the Nova Scotia Southern Railway was bought by the Halifax & South Western Railway. The NSSR had no track built, but it did have a charter under which 22.1 miles 35.6 km of track were built in 1903 by the H&SWR to Caledonia in Queens County from New Germany in Lunenburg County.




1904 July 1
First Train to Caledonia

On this day, the Nova Scotia Central Railway opened its new branch line railway from New Germany, Lunenburg County, through Hemford, Pleasant River, Brookfield Mines, and South Brookfield, to Caledonia, Queens County, 22.1 miles 35.6 km by running its first passenger train to Caledonia and return. The NSCR was controlled by the Halifax & South Western Railway Company, which in turn was controlled by Mackenzie & Mann. At the time of construction in 1903, Mackenzie & Mann were making plans for the completion of the H&SW railway from Halifax to Yarmouth, and the route from Bridgewater to Shelburne was under discussion. For a time, it was proposed that the route from Bridgewater to Shelburne should go via New Germany and Caledonia, which would use the LaHave River Bridge on the Caledonia Branch and thus avoid the considerable expense of a second large bridge across the LaHave River at Bridgewater; this route had been located by the Nova Scotia Southern Railway, passing through South Brookfield and near New Elm, and a detailed survey had been completed, including elevations of the track at all crossings of significant rivers and streams, and then-existing roads; the distance along the centre line of the track, from New Germany to Clement Street in Shelburne, was 70.5 miles 113.5 km. The route that was finally selected, for the Halifax to Yarmouth main line, crossed the LaHave River at Bridgewater. The Caledonia branch line continued operating into the 1970s.




1904 August 19
Excursions to Mulgrave

Two large excursion trains carried picnic parties to Mulgrave from New Glasgow this week.
[Page 1, The Eastern Chronicle, New Glasgow, 19 August 1904.]




1904 August 25
Maccan Railway Station Tender

(Paid advertisement) "Sealed tenders, addressed to the undersigned, and marked on the outside 'Tender for Maccan Station' will be received up to and including Thursday, the 25th day of August, 1904, for the construction of a Station building at Maccan, Nova Scotia. Plans and specification may be seen at the Station Master's Office, Maccan, N.S., and at the office of the Chief Engineer, Moncton, N.B., where forms of tender may be obtained. All the conditions of the specification must be complied with.
D. Pottinger,
General Manager Railway Office, Moncton, N.B.
August 12, 1904
[Page 5, The Eastern Chronicle, New Glasgow, 19 August 1904.]




1904 August 31
Harvest Excursion

The Canadian Pacific Railway advise that the Harvest Excursion to the Northwest will be on August 31, 1904, from stations east of New Glasgow, and on September 1 from New Glasgow and stations west. Judging from the number of enquiries to date there will be a larger number than ever from this section of the country. There was something like 100 from this section alone last August and the C.P.R. was severely taxed to provide accomodation for the whole contingent. A large number were held over at St. John and found and fed at the expense of the C.P.R. It is hoped that the railway management will be better prepared for a large number this time than they were last year. It is also hoped that the weird tales from along the route of fighting, stealing, blood, and carnage will be lacking this year.
[The Eastern Chronicle, New Glasgow, 12 August 1904, page 8]




1904 October 11
1200 Passengers

The electric cars carried twelve hundred passengers on Tuesday (11 October 1904) between Stellarton and Trenton...
[The Eastern Chronicle, 14 October 1904]




1904 October 14, Friday
Egerton Tramway Official Opening

The formal opening ceremony of Egerton Tramway Company's streetcar line in Pictou County was held this day. Regular operations, carrying passengers, began three days earlier, on Tuesday, 11 October 1904. Streetcars continued operating until 7 May 1931.

[In the early 1900s, this type of public transit, using electric-powered passenger vehicles running on steel rails, was known as "trams" or "tramways" or "tram cars". Later, in the 1930s and 1940s, it was generally called "streetcars" for a system that operated mainly within an urban district, and "interurbans" (or, in Ontario, "radials") for lines between two or more urban districts. In the 1980s and 1990s, the term "light rail" is widely used. All these names apply to the same technology.]




1904 October 25
Windsor Railway Station Tender

Intercolonial Railway

(Paid advertisement) "Sealed tenders, addressed to the undersigned, and marked on the outside 'Tender for Windsor Station' will be received up to and including Tuesday, the 25th day of October, 1904, for the construction of a Passenger Station at Windsor, Nova Scotia. Plans and specification may be seen at the office of the Station Master, Windsor, N.S., and at the Chief Engineer's office, Moncton, N.B., where forms of tender may be obtained. All the requirements of the specification must be complied with.
D. Pottinger,
General Manager Railway Office, Moncton, N.B.
11th October, 1904
[Page 4, The Eastern Chronicle, New Glasgow, 18 October 1904.]

[Comment: This tender call is a mystery to me. Why is the ICR building a railway station in Windsor? At the time, the ICR did not operate trains anywhere near Windsor. In 1904, there were two railways operating in Windsor: the Dominion Atlantic Railway and the Midland Railway. At the time this tender call was published, the DAR had been actively negotiating to buy the Midland for more than three years, and the agreement to sell the Midland to the DAR was completed on 6 February 1905, less than four months later. That is, the Midland at this time was pretty much controlled by the DAR, which means that the only railway activities in or near Windsor were those of the DAR. The station buildings and operations at Windsor were the sole concern of the DAR. The ad refers to the station master at Windsor, who was an employee of the DAR, not of the ICR. The ICR had no part of any activity in or near Windsor, so what is this tender call about?]




1904 October 27
Double-Tracking Tender

Intercolonial Railway

(Paid advertisement) "Sealed tenders, addressed to the undersigned, and marked on the outside 'Tender for Double Tracking' will be received up to and including Thursday, the 27th day of October, 1904, for the Grading, etc., to Widen the Present Roadbed for a Double Track between Stellarton and New Glasgow, Nova Scotia. Plans and specification may be seen at the Station Master's office, at New Glasgow, N.S., and at the Chief Engineer's office, Moncton, N.B., where forms of tender may be obtained. All the conditions of the specification must be complied with.
D. Pottinger,
General Manager Railway Office, Moncton, N.B.
12th October, 1904
[Page 4, The Eastern Chronicle, New Glasgow, 18 October 1904.]




1905 January 30
Halifax & South Western Railway Opened

On this day, the Halifax to Yarmouth main line of the Halifax & South Western Railway Company was officially opened for traffic.




1905 May 15
Halifax & South Western Railway Company Buys
the Halifax & Yarmouth Railway Company and
the Middleton & Victoria Beach Railway Company

On this day, the purchase became official, by the Halifax & South Western Railway, of the Halifax & Yarmouth Railway for $675,000, and the Middleton & Victoria Beach Railway for $325,000.  The H&YR had fifty miles 80 km of narrow-gauge track in operation between Yarmouth and Barrington Passage.  The M&VBR had no track in operation, but it had a charter under which 39 miles 63 km were built by the H&SWR from Middleton through Bridgetown to Port Wade, which opened for traffic in 1907.




1907 March 19
Egerton Tramway Ceases Sunday Streetcar Service in Pictou County

On this day, in The Eastern Chronicle, a twice-a-week newspaper published in New Glasgow, the Egerton Tramway Company inserted a Notice to the Public:

"Owing to the fact that another case has been brought by the Lord's Day Alliance against one of the men employed by this Company, under the Act forbidding the performance of servile labour on the Lord's Day, and decided against him, after the original test case had been decided in favour of our employees, both before Stipendary Magistrate and also the County Judge, before whom it was taken on appeal, we have decided to discontinue the operation of any cars on the Sabbath day until we are convinced that the people of the Municipality through which we operate desire to have them run.

The Company has been running its Sunday cars at a loss ever since it began operating, and this coupled with the cost of defending actions against our men, involved too great a loss for the Company to stand. We have therefore decided on the above to avoid further prosecution. We regret, for the sake of our Sunday patrons, that we are obliged to take this step.

Egerton Tramway Company Limited
Charles A. Flaherty, Manager




1907 March 26
Vale Railroad Petition

Mr. Robert Malcolm McGregor, MLA for Pictou County, presented petitions to the Legislature "from the citizens of New Glasgow, Thorburn, and McLellan's Brook, asking that the Vale Railroad should be made part of the Guysboro system when the same is built or else that it should be taken over by the Intercolonial Railway. Mr. McGregor spoke at some length in presenting the petitions stating fully the circumstances of the case and urging the necessity of action to relieve the people in the district affected and to promote the opening up of the coal areas nearby."
[The New Glasgow Eastern Chronicle, 2 April 1907.]




1907 March 28
Subsidy Refund Refused

The Nova Scotia Legislature spent much of this day "discussing the claims of Inverness County for a refund of subsidies paid to the Mackenzie and Mann Railway. The Government did not see its way clear to recoup the County for a bargain which they voluntarily went into, as to do this would open the door to similar claims in all directions."
[The New Glasgow Eastern Chronicle, 2 April 1907]




1907 April 25
Halifax & South Western Railway Company Buys the Liverpool & Milton Railway Company

On this day, the Liverpool & Milton Railway was bought by the Halifax & South Western Railway for $71,550. The L&MR owned and operated a 4.63 mile 7.45 km railway along the west side of the Mersey River, between Liverpool and Rapid Falls, near Milton, in Queens County. Most of the L&MRCo line was abandoned in 1936, but a short section of the old L&MR main line track was used until the late 1980s for the H&SWR main line between Halifax and Yarmouth. Much of the old L&MR roadbed has since been obliterated by highway construction, but parts of it were still visible in the 1990s.




1907 June 14
Special Mail Train

Dateline: Montreal, Friday June 14 – The Intercolonial Railway's special train for the mail from Great Britain, which left North Sydney at 5:25 last evening with the mail from the steamship Victorian, arrived here at 7:45 tonight, having made the run, allowing for the difference of one hour in time, in twenty six hours twenty minutes. All the mail was delivered at the post office here by 9:20, just in time to allow the Western mail to be sent off by tonight' s express train. All the mail by last Friday's steamer which was landed at Rimouski was not delivered at the post office until after midnight, or four hours later than tonight's mail which came via North Sydney.
[The New Glasgow Eastern Chronicle, 25 June 1907, page 2]

[Note: The 26 hours 20 minutes running time, from North Sydney to Montreal, included the time required to ferry the train across the Strait of Canso, from Port Tupper to Mulgrave.]




1909 April 1
New Glasgow Electric Company Sold to Egerton Tramway Company

On 23 April 1909 the Legislature passed an Act (chapter 142, 1909, 9 Edward VII) to confirm the sale, on 1 April 1909, of the New Glasgow Electric Company Limited to the Egerton Tramway Company Limited.




1909 April 23
Egerton Tramway Company Changes Name to Pictou County Electric Company

On 23 April 1909 the Legislature passed an Act (chapter 143, 1909, 9 Edward VII) to change the name of the Egerton Tramway Company Limited to Pictou County Electric Company Limited.




1916 January 1
Musquodoboit Railway Opening Ceremony

On this day was held the official ceremony marking the opening for regular traffic of the Musquodoboit Railway, formally known as the Dartmouth Branch Extension of the Intercolonial Railway. This line ran 69.3 miles 111.6 km from Dartmouth, through Eastern Passage, Lawrencetown, Three-Fathom Harbour, Seaforth, West Chezzetcook, Head of Chezzetcook, East Chezzetcook, Meagher Grant, and Middle Musquodoboit, to Upper Musquodoboit. The plan was to continue building track through to Country Harbour, but this was never done.




1924 February 1
CNR Leases IR&C

On this day, Canadian National Railways leased the Inverness Railway & Coal Company for three years at an annual rental of $25,000, with the option to buy at any time during the lease. IR&C owned and operated a coal mine at Inverness, Cape Breton, and a railway 64.1 miles 103.2 km long from a connection with the Truro - Sydney main line of the CNR at Inverness Junction, near Point Tupper, to Port Hood, Inverness, and Broad Cove. In 2008, 4.8 miles 7.7 km of the original IR&C main line track remains in daily use as a section of the Truro - Sydney main line of the Cape Breton & Central Nova Scotia Railway Company; this is the section between the Canso Causeway and the Port Hawkesbury station, and southward from the Port Hawkesbury station about one km to the junction near Point Tupper.




1928 October 20
End of Streetcar Service in Yarmouth

The electric streetcar line, which began running along Main Street in Yarmouth in 1896, ceases operation. The track was dismantled shortly afterward.




1931 March 23
Cape Breton Electric Company Bankrupt

The Cape Breton Electric Company, which had been incorporated on 30 March 1900 as Cape Breton Electric Tramway & Power Company, went into receivership on this day.




1936 September 27
Windsor - Truro Train Schedule

Dominion Atlantic Railway
Truro Subdivision
Train Schedule
Effective 27 September 1936
All times are Atlantic Standard Time

Eastbound
read down
Westbound
read up
No. 5 No. 3 No. 1 Miles
from
Wind.
Station No. 2 No. 4 No. 6
Freight Mixed Mixed     Mixed Mixed Freight
Mon.
Wed.
Fri.
Sat.
only
Daily
ex.
Sun.
    Daily
ex.
Sun.
Sat.
only
Mon.
Wed.
Fri.
P.M. A.M. P.M.     A.M. P.M. A.M.
12:40 7:55 4:10 0.00 Windsor 9:30 7:20 11:00
    4:16 2.25 Dimock's 9:20    
  8:07 4:22 4.59 Mantua 9:15 7:06 10:44
1:10 8:11 4:27 6.18 Brooklyn 9:10 7:01 10:40
1:20 8:18 4:37 9.86 Scotch Village 9:02 6:53 10:20
1:27 8:23 4:42 12.10 Mosherville 8:55 6:48 10:13
1:37 8:29 4:48 14.94 Stanley 8:48 6:42 10:05
1:57 8:38 4:57 18.70 Clarksville 8:38 6:33 9:55
      20.60 (Water)      
2:06 8:46 5:06 22.84 Midway 8:30 6:25 9:33
2:27 8:54 5:15 26.44 Kennetcook 8:22 6:17 9:25
    5:20 28.65 Rhine's 8:17    
2:40 9:02 5:24 30.31 Upper Kennetcook 8:13 6:09 9:02
2:44 9:05 5:28 31.56 Doddridge 8:09 6:05 8:53
2:55 9:12 5:35 35.06 Burton's 8:00 5:58 8:43
      39.31 (Water)      
3:20 9:23 5:47 40.27 South Maitland 7:46 5:47 8:30
3:26 9:27 5:51 42.04 Green Oaks 7:41 5:41 8:15
3:36 9:35 5:59 45.55 Princeport Road 7:33 5:33 8:05
3:55 9:46 6:12 50.82 Clifton 7:21 5:21 7:45
  9:51 6:17 53.04 Lower Truro   5:15  
4:20 10:05 6:30 57.84 Truro 7:05 5:05 7:25
P.M. A.M. P.M.     A.M. P.M. A.M.
Mon.
Wed.
Fri.
Sat.
only
Daily
ex.
Sun.
    Daily
ex.
Sun.
Sat.
only
Mon.
Wed.
Fri.
No. 5 No. 3 No. 1     No. 2 No. 4 No. 6

No. 2 will flag stop at Rhine's on Mondays only.

No. 1 will flag stop at Rhine's on Mondays and Fridays only. On this railway line, odd numbers were assigned to trains travelling eastward, from Windsor to Truro, and even numbers were assigned to trains travelling westward, from Truro to Windsor.

Trains No. 2 and No. 1 constituted the round trip Windsor - Truro - Windsor of the First Class mixed (passenger and freight) train which operated six days a week.

Trains No. 3 and No. 4 constituted the round trip Truro - Windsor - Truro of the Second Class mixed (passenger and freight) train which operated Saturday only.

On Saturday, there were two passenger trains in the morning (one in each direction) and two more in the afternoon..

[Source: DAR Employee's Timetable 91, taking effect 12:01am, Sunday, September 27, 1936. George E. Graham, Vice-President and General Manager, Kentville; Laurie Ells, Superintendent, Kentville.]




1949 March 26, Saturday
Last Electric Streetcar Service in Downtown Halifax

This was the last day of operation of electric streetcars in downtown Halifax. During the night of 26-27 March, the overhead wire which had supplied electric power at 600 volts to the streetcars was taken down by crews of the Nova Scotia Light & Power Company, which owned and operated the transit system in Halifax; the overhead system to supply the replacement trolley coaches had previously been installed about one foot above the old streetcar overhead. A few streetcars continued to operate for a few weeks, on five outlying routes: route 3 on Gottingen Street north of Cunard, route 3 on Barrington Street north of Cogswell, route 5 on Quinpool Road west of Oxford, route 6 on Oxford Street south of Coburg, and route 9 on Tower Road south of Inglis. Over the next few weeks, these "orphaned" streetcar routes were converted one at a time to trolley coach operation.




1949 March 27, Sunday
First Electric Trolley Coach Service in Downtown Halifax

The first day of operation in downtown Halifax of electric trolley coaches, which replaced the old electric streetcars on the four downtown routes, 1, 2, 7 and 8. Traffic was two and a half times the normal volume for a Sunday, and even with 33 trolley coaches in operation they were crammed to capacity most of the day. The rubber-tired coaches were powered by 600 volts DC supplied through two overhead wires. The cash fare was 10 cents, the same rate that had been in effect since 1925 and was to remain in effect until 1957. A lower fare was available by buying three tickets for 25 cents, or lower yet at 14 tickets for one dollar. Passengers could also buy a weekly pass, good for unlimited riding for seven days, for $1.25.




1949 April 28
Last Electric Streetcar Service

The last transit route in Nova Scotia on which the public could ride an electric streetcar was the Richmond line, route 3 on Barrington Street, north of Buckingham Street, which was the last survivor of the five outlying streetcar routes "orphaned" when the downtown area was converted to trolley coach operation one month earlier. April 28th was the last day of operation of the Richmond line. The next day, trolley coaches took over, and the last streetcar was towed over the abandoned track, to the car barn on Lower Water Street.





Significant Dates in
Nova Scotia Railway History

Before 1850   1850-1899   1900-1949   1950 to now



Valid HTML 4.01 webpage

W3C HTML Validation Service
http://validator.w3.org/

Valid CSS webpage

W3C CSS Validation Service
http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/


First uploaded to the WWW:   2008 July 03
Latest update:   2012 July 27